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Thread: Francis Albert Sinatra Does His Thing (1968) DVD/VHS

  1. #21
    Guest
    Bumping for a discussion of Frank's ballad medley on this show in this thread:
    Did Frank Sinatra ever record "Cottage for Sale"?

  2. #22
    Guest
    Anniversary bump: November 25th, 1968

  3. Watching this now and what a great piece of entertainment it is!
    Frank's opening numbers are terrfic with "groovy" arrangements of Hello Young Lovers and Baubles, Bangles and Beads. Two great peformances, this is followed by a throughly entertaining introduction by Frank followed by a very poingant Cycles with Frank looking oh so cool

    To be honest I don't really care for the other artists I'd rather more Sinatra. Frank performs a fine medley of songs which shows he was really capable of performing a song.

    There's further fun to be had with a bit before his last five performances in which he shows off his great sense of humour. Frank's final five are all great, just great typical Sinatra. All in all an entertaing hour

  4. #24
    Broadcast Anniversary: November 25, 1968

  5. #25
    Bumped for this special's inclusion as part of the November 2nd Release of Frank Sinatra : The Concert Collection DVD box.

  6. Quote Originally Posted by Guest View Post
    Then we had some fun. The 5th Dimension sing Sweet Blindness with Frank joining in as the 6th Dimension. It was a lot of fun watching Frank join in on that song. While Frank was singing with the 5th Dimension, he was wearing a jacket that really dazzled. Typical mod 60s.

    Source: YouTube


    Bob in Boston

  7. #27
    A great show. The scenes at the motel are pure class. Love Cycles performance
    "How long I been on ...?"

  8. Dad was always so much fun, especially when he embraced the fashions of the day!

  9. #29
    I love that show!
    LOURDIE
    Frank Sinatra: You will be my music.

  10. #30
    Loved that T.V. special and Ms Caroll is one sophisticated lady.

  11. #31
    That's a fun clip.
    When You're Here, It's Family
    www.georgelyons.net

  12. #32
    I like that too, a lot, just for amusement value, Frank had a sense of humour and in the same show when he went back to his standards, his voice was as ever amazing (eg Nice and Easy)

  13. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by SecretLove View Post
    Ms Caroll is one sophisticated lady.
    Diahann Carroll was "ravishing" on the Emmy Awards this year and will be returning to Broadway, after an absence of over 30 years, in a revival of A Raisin in the Sun in March.

  14. #34
    This show will always be special to me. When Frank passed I was taking summer courses at Penn State and the campus was kind of empty. In honor of Frank, Nickelodeon showed a lot of Frank Sinatra shows as a way of celebrating his life. I kind of was a recluse the next few days mourning the great loss and taking in all the new Sinatra I could. I had not seen this special up until that time. I was blown away by his version of Nice N' Easy. It's is just so cool with the right amount of intensity.
    Thanks,
    Steve
    We ROCKED a romance to the Castle Rock!

  15. #35

    fas does his thing

    I saw it when it was first telecast. I don't remember everything exactly, but i do remember it was a wonderful show. I love the sweet blindness clip. It was obvious they are all having a great time (FS included). And yeah the outfits are silly, but FS is slim and trim and so cool. I have heard marilyn mccoo and billy davis jr on siriusly sinatra. They spoke lovingly of that show and their time with FS. And like almost every musician past and present, they thought FS was tops.

    vinny b.

  16. #36
    Close your eyes (if you must -- after all the song is called "Sweet Blindness" -- and sip some absolute magic. Nice to know, decades later, that Frank admired this truly great song by the best group of its kind. The gorgeous singer at stage right hosted a "Playing Favorites" show, with her husband (center stage). Or am I mis-remembering (again). Thanks Bob for posting this one!

    Just realized my note of appreciation is for a video Bob posted eight years ago! That's known as "belated thanks" Bob.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U60ixsEQUrA

  17. #37
    Sadly, this one makes me cringe in places, although Sinatra's performances themselves are as good as ever in most cases.

    But it demonstrates quite easily, I think, how the changes in music in the 1960s were affecting artists like Frank.

    From the mid-1960s to the early 1970s:
    *Doris Day retired from recording
    *Julie London retired from recording after her final album, "Yummy, Yummy, Yummy!"
    *Bobby Darin recorded his last album of standards in 1966, and only released three albums between 1968 and 1973.
    *The Ellington band were reduced to recording jazz versions of Blowin' in the Wind, and were without a permanent label in the late 1960s
    *Count Basie was also without a permanent home, and his repertoire now included "Oh, Pretty Woman" and other such gems.
    *Mel Torme recorded no studio albums between 1970 and 1976.
    *Ella Fitzgerald, in possibly the vocal form of her life, had no permanent recording contract.
    *Sammy Davis made his pretty disastrous move to Motown, with his recording career effectively over by 1974 (only live albums and one more studio album would follow)
    *Dean Martin released only two albums after 1973.
    *Louis Armstrong somehow got persuaded to make a country LP that included Running Bear!
    *Many jazz stars had no obvious home when it came to record labels.

    It's startling just how the changes in the music scene affected Sinatra and his contemporaries. Those that made it through this difficult period generally came out the other side and did well. For example, Mel Torme and Rosemary Clooney (and others) had lengthy careers on the Concord label. Meanwhile, Basie, Ella, Sarah Vaughan, Dizzy Gillespie, Oscar Peterson, and many others found a wonderful home when impresario Norman Granz set up the Pablo label - where they could record pretty much what they wanted without commercial pressures, and the number of Grammys awarded to that label over the next decade and a half shows just how great some of that music is. Frank, of course, made his successful return both to the studio and live performances. But some weren't so lucky: Doris Day and Julie London had effectively hung up the microphone for good. Ellington, Armstrong, Judy Garland and Bobby Darin had all passed away by the mid-1970s.

    FAS Does His Thing is like a snapshot of all that turmoil - and the title was entirely inaccurate, as he was doing everybody else's thing. But amongst all the trimmings of the Nehru jacket, love-beads, and sparkly suits, the music was as good as ever, and I think Frank certainly did the right thing in his next special to go back to being himself rather than trying to get "with it."

    It can't be a coincidence that early in the 1969 TV special comes My Way. Coming after Does His Thing, it's almost like a statement of intent: "I tried your way, and I didn't get on so well" - although Frank was also savvy enough to realise he could take some of the best songs of the time and do them his way with incredible success in many cases. But the visual attempt to fit in had gone, and the arrangements were mostly pure Sinatra. The suit was back, and the love beads presumably collecting dust in a drawer somewhere. And the same was true of the 1970s - Stevie Wonder, John Denver, Jim Croce, Neil Diamond, even Tony Orlando, Elton John and Elvis songs were drafted in, but without medallions, flares or jumpsuits.

    I really think there could be a great book written about how the changes in pop music affected these artists during the 1965-1975 period. The work that they did produce during this time is overlooked, or even viewed as a novelty within their catalogues in some cases. It would be fascinating to learn about some of the creative decisions that were made and how the public viewed them.

    EDIT: Sorry, got carried away!

  18. Watched this one this evening, i struggle with it i must admit - but Frank could find the meaning in any seeming meaningless lyric, true art to turn what history looks back on as 'fad' or 'fashion' into a special moment.
    Adam
    Be Aware & Don't Despair

  19. #39
    Excellent analysis, Shane...a very sad time for lovers of The Great American Songbook. I enjoyed "FAS Does His Thing," because I enjoyed everything Frank did on TV! There were three moments that absolutely knocked me out...(1) Diahann Carroll's fabulous version of "Music That Makes Me Dance." While most people look at "Funny Girl," and instantly think of "People," I think "...Music" is one of Jule Styne's most gorgeous creations, and the Bob Merrill lyrics are wonderfully haunting and sensitive! The movie version eliminated "Music That Makes Me Dance" completely, and added "My Man," obviously not a Styne tune! On TV, Ms. Carroll's version was first-cabin, all the way; (2) Frank's medley of "Nice 'N' Easy," and "How Little We Know" is terrific! The numbers sound fresh, and Frank is clearly enjoying singing these all-time beauties; and (3) Frank's performance of "Lost in the Stars" is brilliant. This is one of the great Broadway numbers.Period! Frank's version brings out every nuance, and significance, and is a master lesson in both singing AND acting 101! The Weill classic is magnificently performed on "The Concert Sinatra." It is magnificently performed on "FAS Does His Thing!"
    Stanley

  20. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by sschweiger View Post
    Excellent analysis, Shane...a very sad time for lovers of The Great American Songbook. I enjoyed "FAS Does His Thing," because I enjoyed everything Frank did on TV! There were three moments that absolutely knocked me out...(1) Diahann Carroll's fabulous version of "Music That Makes Me Dance." While most people look at "Funny Girl," and instantly think of "People," I think "...Music" is one of Jule Styne's most gorgeous creations, and the Bob Merrill lyrics are wonderfully haunting and sensitive! The movie version eliminated "Music That Makes Me Dance" completely, and added "My Man," obviously not a Styne tune! On TV, Ms. Carroll's version was first-cabin, all the way; (2) Frank's medley of "Nice 'N' Easy," and "How Little We Know" is terrific! The numbers sound fresh, and Frank is clearly enjoying singing these all-time beauties; and (3) Frank's performance of "Lost in the Stars" is brilliant. This is one of the great Broadway numbers.Period! Frank's version brings out every nuance, and significance, and is a master lesson in both singing AND acting 101! The Weill classic is magnificently performed on "The Concert Sinatra." It is magnificently performed on "FAS Does His Thing!"
    Yes, those moments in the show were very good indeed. I hadn't realised "music" was from Funny Girl. I seem to recall Judy Garland did the song at one point, too - maybe in the Palladium concert with Liza? Lost in the Stars is quite something - and almost seems like it's from a different show. Perhaps unfortunately, when I first got these shows, Does His Thing was sandwiched on a VHS tape with the show with Ella and Jobim at the beginning and the 1969 Sinatra show at the end. Does His Thing never stood a chance for me when in that company!

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