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Thread: Doris Day

  1. #401
    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Sarbo View Post
    Biographers of Ronald Reagan have commented on the "Chemistry" he had with Day in "The Winning Team" the bio of pitcher Grover Cleveland Alexander.

    Day herself said that "if the timing had been right" she might have been the "First Lady" instead of Nancy.

    Gig Young gracefully loses Day to Sinatra in "Young At Heart", Clark Gable in "Teacher's Pet" and Cary Grant in "That Touch Of Mink".

    "Love Or Leave Me" with James Cagney of course great but "The West Point Story" is pure fun with Cagney again in song and dance mode.
    I really used to like The West Point Story when I was a kid and it was shown on TV with great regularity. I saw it recently, though, and it was one of those "what did I see in this" moments! I don't ever remember the Winning Team being on UK TV, and it's not been on home video here either. I happened to see The Man Who Knew Too Much about a month ago, and thought how well-judged her performance was. Those hysterical crying scenes (which she had to do all over again in Midnight Lace!) would have been so easy to take over the top, but she manages to judge them oh-so-perfectly. She is by far the best thing about the movie.

  2. Quote Originally Posted by shanebrown View Post
    I really used to like The West Point Story when I was a kid and it was shown on TV with great regularity. I saw it recently, though, and it was one of those "what did I see in this" moments! I don't ever remember the Winning Team being on UK TV, and it's not been on home video here either. I happened to see The Man Who Knew Too Much about a month ago, and thought how well-judged her performance was. Those hysterical crying scenes (which she had to do all over again in Midnight Lace!) would have been so easy to take over the top, but she manages to judge them oh-so-perfectly. She is by far the best thing about the movie.
    Shane, I was just thinking about Midnight Lace before reading your post. I saw it when I was a kid, probably 7 or 8, and it scared the hell out of me. I think my parents were happy to let me watch an 'innocent' Doris Day movie... I still think of the menacing stalker's voice, "Mrs Preston!"

  3. #403

    doris day

    she was talented and lovely. left us lots of good music and movies too.

    vinny b.

  4. #404

    Doris Day -- The Way We Were

    A friend (and my favorite musicologist / social commentator) Canadian Mark Steyn shared a video I'd not seen – from a 1975 television special – Doris Day, at mid-life, singing “The Way We Were -- from a then-current, big screen hit movie of the same name (whose title track won the “Best Original Song” Oscar).

    For only the second time in recent months (the first was seeing Frank Sinatra on live TV, singing a medley of five of his best ballads) – yes, for only the second time in recent days, this video provided a reminder of how good film actors can bring something extra to a song like this one. Case in point. The way she was – age 53 – and the way we remember Doris Day from her subsequent TV career. How we loved her.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=cBXMjXD4VGc

    [Mark Steyn wrote a column titled “Every Dog Must Have His Day” featuring a photo of Doris in a T-shirt that says, “Be Kind to Animals Or I'll Kill You.” Mark quoted from a telephone interview he did with Doris, decades ago. The article at his website says, in part:]

    “With Sinatra, we assume the songs tell us something about the man. So I was interested to know whether "Move Over, Darling" and "It's Magic" really sum up Doris Day. "Well, I think they're part of who I am," she began, and a cacophony that sounded like the Singing Dogs reunion tour rent the air. "Uh-oh," she explained, "that's Buster Brown. He's a cross between a German short-haired pointer and an English sheepdog . . ."

    "About your work with André Previn..," I said, struggling over the barks to stay on track.

    "He looks like a wire-haired pointer," said Doris. Which, to be honest, I couldn't quite see, until I realized she was still talking about Buster Brown. "And I have a beautiful shitsu called Wesley Winfield." Most of her dozens of dogs, it seems, are mongrel strays, and she can't understand the fuss about purebreds - although as it happens, Doris Day, neé Doris Kappelhoff, is purebred Aryan (all four of her grandparents were German).

    Buster Brown, Wesley Winfield... Doris Day likes any alliterative appellation apart from her own. She was renamed after "Day After Day", an old ballad from the Twenties that the Princeton Triangle Club Jazz Band recorded with freshman vocalist Jimmy Stewart:

    Just as evening follows afternoon
    I follow you round
    Just as age can't change the sun or moon
    Our love stays sublime
    Regardless of time...

    Doris Kappelhoff sang it at her first club booking in Cincinnati, and it went over so well that the bandleader proposed she become "Doris Day". She never cared for it: it was no "Buster Brown". "Doris Day sounds phony," she told me. "I've always thought that." Many friends call her "Clara", because (she says) she looks more like a Clara; Rock Hudson called her "Eunice"; and Bob Hope favored "JB", short for "Jut Butt": As he once said to me, very appreciatively, "You could play bridge on her ass," although I don't believe he ever did.

    JB was in her early seventies when we spoke, and looked pretty much the same as ever, eager and perky, like a short-haired pointer. Singing contemporaries like Rosemary Clooney and Margaret Whiting were still out there on the road day after day, night after night, but Doris had no desire to join them. "Maybe they need the money," she said. "Maybe they're not okay in that department."

    Doris is famously okay in that department. The standard music-industry line on her is that she's the most unappreciated female singer in the business. The second standard music-industry line on her is: if she's that unappreciated, how come she's so rich? After her husband Marty Melcher's sudden death in 1968, she discovered he'd blown through all the money. Half-a-decade later, a California judge awarded her damages of $22,835,646 from her business manager, and that buys a lot of dog chow.

    "Yes, but," I said, "Sinatra's okay in the money department. But he's still touring..."

    "Men have a need to go out and work," she said firmly. "Women are content to be at home. We've got our friends to talk to, and go to the supermarket with." Notwithstanding Chris Frayling and the other eminent scholars who hail Doris Day as a pioneer feminist icon (mainly for her refusal to surrender to Rock Hudson in those sex comedies}, the star herself has a casual way of wreaking havoc with their theses. And, while I like Pillow Talk and Lover Come Back, if you're looking for strong-woman stuff try the earlier movies: as Ruth Etting doing "Ten Cents As Dance" in Love Me Or Leave Me, or the small-town girl who's tougher than the feckless musician (played by Sinatra) she takes up with in Young At Heart.

    You can see why Mike Nichols wanted to cast her as Mrs Robinson in The Graduate, but you can also understand why Doris figured there was nothing for her in agreeing to it. I brought up the old Groucho Marx line: "I knew Doris Day before she was a virgin." She insisted it wasn't Groucho, preferring to attribute it to Oscar Levant. "That was such a stupid Levant joke!" she said, "though it's very possible HE didn't say it, either!"

  5. #405
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Blackburn View Post
    A friend (and my favorite musicologist / social commentator) Canadian Mark Steyn shared a video I'd not seen – from a 1975 television special – Doris Day, at mid-life, singing “The Way We Were -- from a then-current, big screen hit movie of the same name (whose title track won the “Best Original Song” Oscar).

    For only the second time in recent months (the first was seeing Frank Sinatra on live TV, singing a medley of five of his best ballads) – yes, for only the second time in recent days, this video provided a reminder of how good film actors can bring something extra to a song like this one. Case in point. The way she was – age 53 – and the way we remember Doris Day from her subsequent TV career. How we loved her.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=cBXMjXD4VGc

    [Mark Steyn wrote a column titled “Every Dog Must Have His Day” featuring a photo of Doris in a T-shirt that says, “Be Kind to Animals Or I'll Kill You.” Mark quoted from a telephone interview he did with Doris, decades ago. The article at his website says, in part:]

    “With Sinatra, we assume the songs tell us something about the man. So I was interested to know whether "Move Over, Darling" and "It's Magic" really sum up Doris Day. "Well, I think they're part of who I am," she began, and a cacophony that sounded like the Singing Dogs reunion tour rent the air. "Uh-oh," she explained, "that's Buster Brown. He's a cross between a German short-haired pointer and an English sheepdog . . ."

    "About your work with André Previn..," I said, struggling over the barks to stay on track.

    "He looks like a wire-haired pointer," said Doris. Which, to be honest, I couldn't quite see, until I realized she was still talking about Buster Brown. "And I have a beautiful shitsu called Wesley Winfield." Most of her dozens of dogs, it seems, are mongrel strays, and she can't understand the fuss about purebreds - although as it happens, Doris Day, neé Doris Kappelhoff, is purebred Aryan (all four of her grandparents were German).

    Buster Brown, Wesley Winfield... Doris Day likes any alliterative appellation apart from her own. She was renamed after "Day After Day", an old ballad from the Twenties that the Princeton Triangle Club Jazz Band recorded with freshman vocalist Jimmy Stewart:

    Just as evening follows afternoon
    I follow you round
    Just as age can't change the sun or moon
    Our love stays sublime
    Regardless of time...

    Doris Kappelhoff sang it at her first club booking in Cincinnati, and it went over so well that the bandleader proposed she become "Doris Day". She never cared for it: it was no "Buster Brown". "Doris Day sounds phony," she told me. "I've always thought that." Many friends call her "Clara", because (she says) she looks more like a Clara; Rock Hudson called her "Eunice"; and Bob Hope favored "JB", short for "Jut Butt": As he once said to me, very appreciatively, "You could play bridge on her ass," although I don't believe he ever did.

    JB was in her early seventies when we spoke, and looked pretty much the same as ever, eager and perky, like a short-haired pointer. Singing contemporaries like Rosemary Clooney and Margaret Whiting were still out there on the road day after day, night after night, but Doris had no desire to join them. "Maybe they need the money," she said. "Maybe they're not okay in that department."

    Doris is famously okay in that department. The standard music-industry line on her is that she's the most unappreciated female singer in the business. The second standard music-industry line on her is: if she's that unappreciated, how come she's so rich? After her husband Marty Melcher's sudden death in 1968, she discovered he'd blown through all the money. Half-a-decade later, a California judge awarded her damages of $22,835,646 from her business manager, and that buys a lot of dog chow.

    "Yes, but," I said, "Sinatra's okay in the money department. But he's still touring..."

    "Men have a need to go out and work," she said firmly. "Women are content to be at home. We've got our friends to talk to, and go to the supermarket with." Notwithstanding Chris Frayling and the other eminent scholars who hail Doris Day as a pioneer feminist icon (mainly for her refusal to surrender to Rock Hudson in those sex comedies}, the star herself has a casual way of wreaking havoc with their theses. And, while I like Pillow Talk and Lover Come Back, if you're looking for strong-woman stuff try the earlier movies: as Ruth Etting doing "Ten Cents As Dance" in Love Me Or Leave Me, or the small-town girl who's tougher than the feckless musician (played by Sinatra) she takes up with in Young At Heart.

    You can see why Mike Nichols wanted to cast her as Mrs Robinson in The Graduate, but you can also understand why Doris figured there was nothing for her in agreeing to it. I brought up the old Groucho Marx line: "I knew Doris Day before she was a virgin." She insisted it wasn't Groucho, preferring to attribute it to Oscar Levant. "That was such a stupid Levant joke!" she said, "though it's very possible HE didn't say it, either!"
    The Graduate offer to Day has always been an intriguing idea, and while it might not have been a good choice for her, it certainly would have been a more interesting end to her film career than the movies that did mark the end of it around that time. Her final four or five movies were pretty grim affairs, sadly, and, like a few other movie careers that ended at the same time, hers just seemed to peter out with the studios pretty much asking the question, "what are we meant to do with Doris Day in the late 1960s?" (I would suggest the same question was asked by MGM when it came to Elvis's movie career at exactly the same time).

    It seems odd to me that, after 1960, she abandoned serious roles in films, and I think that's a shame. I'm sure she would have been a better fit for Torn Curtain by Hitchcock than Julie Andrews was, and would have worked well in a movie like Wait Until Dark. I guess that, sadly, she no longer had the box office draw to be considered for those kinds of roles, even if she wanted to be. It's also odd that she never really got in the movie musical revival that occurred in the mid-60s when My Fair Lady, Camelot, Funny Girl etc came out. She says she turned down The Sound of Music, so it's not like she wasn't considered for those movies, and one can only wonder what she might have been able to make out of The Unsinkable Molly Brown or Thoroughly modern Millie, for example.

  6. Quote Originally Posted by Dina View Post
    It seems they were successful. There is a lovely tribute playing right now on Siriusly Sinatra with some excerpts from the NFF show with Doris. Thank you, Nancy and Chuck.
    I caught this yesterday afternoon from 5 to 5:30 pm ET. I don’t see a posted schedule, but it’s being repeated over the coming days. Good reason to listen to Siriusly Sinatra.

    Bob.

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