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Thread: Today in Frank Sinatra history

  1. #6881

    10 October

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    OCTOBER 9-13, 1985: Seven shows at the Golden Nugget in Atlantic City.

    OCTOBER 7-20, 1976: His tour took him to Hartford, Binghamton, Pittsburgh, Providence, New Haven, Montreal, Syracuse, Norfolk, and Richmond.

    OCTOBER 2–29, 1974: Frank launched a nine-city Eastern tour with bandleader Woody Herman and his Young Thundering Herd.

    OCTOBER 10, 1973: Agnew resigned his office as Vice President because of a criminal investigation.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  2. #6882

    11 October

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    OCTOBER 9-13, 1985: Seven shows at the Golden Nugget in Atlantic City.

    OCTOBER 7-20, 1976: His tour took him to Hartford, Binghamton, Pittsburgh, Providence, New Haven, Montreal, Syracuse, Norfolk, and Richmond.

    OCTOBER 2–29, 1974: Frank launched a nine-city Eastern tour with bandleader Woody Herman and his Young Thundering Herd.

    OCTOBER 11, 1965: In the first of two studio sessions this month, he recorded "Come Fly with Me," "I'll Never Smile Again," and "From Here to Eternity." Also this year, in addition to the Grammy-winning September of My Years, he produced two collectors' albums: Sinatra '65, a compilation including "I've Never Been in Love Before," "When Somebody Loves You," and "Luck Be a Lady"—from his best sessions throughout the sixties; and My Kind of Broadway, a bouquet of hit show tunes including "Golden Moment," "Hello Dolly," "They Can't Take That Away from Me," "Nice Work If You Can Get It," and "Without a Song."

    OCTOBER 11, 1944: With 5,000 teenage fans screaming, stamping their feet, and running up the aisles to the stage, Dad opened another historic engagement at New York's Paramount. When many of the bobby-soxers refused to leave the theater at noon after his first performance, the 30,000 fans waiting outside—many there since the night before—stampeded in rage, and it took the police until late that night to quell what became known as the Columbus Day Riot. New York's Sunday News compared the mass hysteria attending Sinatra's appearance with such historic events as the mob scene at silent-screen star Rudolph Valentino's funeral and the Children's Crusade of Europe's Dark Ages.


    A huge crowd of Sinatra fans outside New York's Paramount stampeded in rage after being turned away when many of the 5,000 screaming teenagers inside refused to leave after Dad's previous performance. It took the police hours to quell what became known as the Columbus Day Riot on October 11, 1944. Even Mayor LaGuardia was affected by the hysteria. He gave his annual speech to a smaller crowd than Frank Sinatra had waiting in line at the Paramount.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  3. OCTOBER 11, 1965:

    In the first of two studio sessions this month, he recorded "Come Fly with Me," "I'll Never Smile Again," and "From Here to Eternity." Also this year, in addition to the Grammy-winning September of My Years, he produced two collectors' albums: Sinatra '65, a compilation including "I've Never Been in Love Before," "When Somebody Loves You," and "Luck Be a Lady"—from his best sessions throughout the sixties; and My Kind of Broadway, a bouquet of hit show tunes including "Golden Moment," "Hello Dolly," "They Can't Take That Away from Me," "Nice Work If You Can Get It," and "Without a Song."
    What a marvelous month!

  4. I would not have left, either.
    A Nightingale Sang In Berkeley Square

    My favorite song.

  5. #6885

    12 October

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    OCTOBER 9-13, 1985: Seven shows at the Golden Nugget in Atlantic City.

    OCTOBER 12–13, 1984: He did four shows at the Golden Nugget in Las Vegas.

    OCTOBER 12–18, 1981: Engagements at Kansas City's Municipal Auditorium, Wichita's Century Two Convention Hall, Houston's Jones Hall, New Orleans' Municipal Auditorium, and a benefit performance at the Carousel Ball in Denver for the Diabetes Association.

    OCTOBER 12, 1979: He co-starred with Flip Wilson, Natalie Cole, and Robert Merrill in a benefit performance at the Waldorf-Astoria for the World Mercy Fund, which was founded by Bishop Murray in Africa in 1969. FS received the Primum Viveré (Life First) Award from World Mercy. The award is given to men or women in various fields who have excelled in their chosen profession and who have supported humanitarian causes, especially in the Third World. Engraved on the award are the words, "The Greatest Good You Can Do for Another Is Not Just to Share with Him Your Riches But to Reveal to Him His Own."

    ROBERT MERRILL ON SINATRA'S FAME: You go through a stage door and out into a crowd with Frank and you can feel a certain tension. Frank has said to me, "God, I'd love to walk on the Via Veneto, just walk. Or Fifth Avenue. Or the Champs-Elysees." But he can't. After an event he needs people with him; he needs guards. My wife, Marion, and I left Carnegie Hall with him after a concert and there were hundreds of people waiting. And, as we left, this crowd—I don't know how to say it—it was like a rainstorm, like a dark cloud. It gathered and practically attacked us. There was a limousine waiting and Frank was behind us. He put his arms around Marion. He was concerned that she was going to get hurt. And he shoved us—actually, physically—into the car. We'd have been hurt. They mean well, but there's this tremendous adulation. People love him so, they forget he's a human being. And this is because he's a storyteller and a very compassionate man. He's sensitive—so automatically he's sensitive to words, to the story that they tell. What you are comes out in your music.

    I remember being backstage at the Met before he performed a concert. He had a lot of press there and he handled everyone beautifully. Then one girl from a local station put a microphone in front of his face. She said, "Mr. Sinatra"—he was very nice to her, very pleasant—"What are you doing at the Metropolitan? What could you do at the Metropolitan?" Now, I held Francis's hand, you know. I sort of wanted to hold him back, but he was very pleasant. "Well," he said, "I do a little singing and I dance and I do comedy and I juggle." And she said, "Come on, now! Do you belong in the Metropolitan?" She was insulting him, hurting him, trying to get something controversial. She was trying to pick a fight. But he was very nice. Very controlled. But I wasn't. I got angry! I grabbed the mike, and her, and shoved her off.

    OCTOBER 7-20, 1976: His tour took him to Hartford, Binghamton, Pittsburgh, Providence, New Haven, Montreal, Syracuse, Norfolk, and Richmond.

    OCTOBER 2–29, 1974: Frank launched a nine-city Eastern tour with bandleader Woody Herman and his Young Thundering Herd.

    OCTOBER 12, 1962: The Manchurian Candidate, Dad's fourth film in a busy year, premiered nationally. It was his most powerful performance since The Man with the Golden Arm. The film would end up being withdrawn from the market for many years and did not resurface until 1986. Many stories made the rounds as to why this happened, but the simple truth was that, as my father later recalled, "I didn't know that we owned the rights. Whoever was working for me apparently made a pretty good deal. I didn't deal much with my business people. They'd bawl me out for spending too much money every time we talked."

    OCTOBER 12, 1960: Hawaii's Republican candidate for the House of Representatives, Frederick Titcomb, criticized show business people for making a farce out of serious politics. In Maui for the location shooting of The Devil at Four O'Clock—and to perform at a Kennedy for President show at the Waikiki Shell—Frank defended the right of entertainers to campaign for their political convictions: "The Hearst papers throughout the nation are campaigning for Nixon and throwing a lot of propaganda in. If this organization of newspapers can do it, then why shouldn't I just by singing? I've been campaigning for Democrats ever since I marched in a parade for Al Smith when I was a 12-year-old kid."

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  6. OCTOBER 11, 1965: In the first of two studio sessions this month, he recorded "Come Fly with Me," "I'll Never Smile Again," and "From Here to Eternity."
    Just a small clarification for historical accuracy: Sinatra did not remake his 1953 Capitol recording of "From Here to Eternity." The songs recorded on this date for Reprise were intended for the double-LP anthology, A Man and His Music, but "Eternity" was an orchestra-only track that was used as background for Frank's narration and the film scene soundtrack presented on the album.

    From Here To Eternity (1965 Version)

    Source: YouTube


    On Spotify: —> From Here To Eternity - 1965 Version
    Details of the two October '65 session dates: —> Frank Sinatra Sessionography

    Bob.

  7. #6887

    13 October

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    OCTOBER 9-13, 1985: Seven shows at the Golden Nugget in Atlantic City.

    OCTOBER 12–13, 1984: He did four shows at the Golden Nugget in Las Vegas.

    OCTOBER 12–18, 1981: Engagements at Kansas City's Municipal Auditorium, Wichita's Century Two Convention Hall, Houston's Jones Hall, New Orleans' Municipal Auditorium, and a benefit performance at the Carousel Ball in Denver for the Diabetes Association.

    OCTOBER 13–27, 1979: Another short concert tour to New Haven, Providence, Portland (Maine), Montreal, Buffalo, and Binghamton, then back to Resorts International in Atlantic City.

    OCTOBER 13, 1978: FS, Pat Henry, and the 5th Dimension performed at the World Mercy Fund benefit at the Waldorf.



    PAT HENRY ON WORKING WITH SINATRA: I worked for a while as Frank Sinatra's opening act. You never know what's going to happen when you're with Frank. One day he came to New York, called me and said, "Pat have you got a passport?" I said, "Why?" He said, "in case we ever go to England. We may do something over there." I said, "Yeah, I got one." He said, "Well, come with me to Marino's. I'm having dinner with Kirk Kerkorian and the guys. Bring your passport. Let me see it." Like an idiot I go. I have $37 and a passport and I'm sitting there having dinner and Frank said, "We're gonna go see Kirk's new plane; he's got a DC-9 and we're gonna go out to LaGuardia and look at it." So I said, "Good." We go out and he said, "We're gonna give it a test run." I said, "Wonderful." We get on the plane, we're giving it a test run, and soon it's two hours later. I asked, "How long are we gonna test this plane?" Frank says, "Oh, I forgot to tell you—we're going to England." I said, "Are you crazy? I only got one suit to my name, what I'm wearing. That's all I've got." "So," he said, "we won't go to the same place twice."

    OCTOBER 7-20, 1976: His tour took him to Hartford, Binghamton, Pittsburgh, Providence, New Haven, Montreal, Syracuse, Norfolk, and Richmond.

    OCTOBER 13, 1974: At Madison Square Garden in New York City, "The Main Event" was staged in a boxing ring and hosted by sportscaster Howard Cosell. The show, the idea of promoter Jerry Weintraub, was broadcast live around the world. It was followed by an album of the same name, released on November 1st. Weintraub: "He wasn't too keen on doing TV. He didn't want to rehearse, he didn't want to bother with it. I went to Vegas to meet with him, and I went up to his suite and we had a cup of coffee. He said, 'What do you want, pal?' I said, 'I want you to do a TV special.' He said, 'Aw, I don't want to do a TV special.' 'Come on,' I said. 'We'll do it live from Madison Square Garden and we'll call it "The Main Event." And we'll make it like a boxing ring. We'll get Howard Cosell to do the announcing. [That's what did it.] You are the main event, you are the greatest singer in the world, you'll be the main event.' He said, 'I like it. Do it.'

    "We put the thing together and we went into New York and we had 350 technicians working on that show. I was producing it, and I was over at the Garden and Frank never came over. I had all these people and it was a live show and we were doing an album and we were going to broadcast around the world as well. So it was not a little thing that we were doing here. And I called him at the hotel and said I needed the lineup of songs, but he kept stalling me.

    "Finally I got a call from his secretary, and she gave me a bunch of songs. And they're none of his songs. No 'Chicago,' no 'My Way.' Nothing. None of his stuff. I said, 'My God, I have got to talk to him.' So I run over to his hotel, walk into his suite, and he is sitting there in a bathrobe reading the newspaper. I said, 'Frank, what are you doing?' He said, 'I wanted to see ya, I figured it was the only way to get you over here.' Then he gives me his songs, his regular lineup. And he says to me, 'I'll see you over there. What time are we starting?' I said, 'Nine o'clock we're on the air live, around the world.' He said, 'Great, I'll be there. Don't worry about it.' "

    Jerry worried. "Twenty till nine, his limousine pulls up. He gets out of the car, and he walks backstage, and he says to me, 'Pal, you don't look too good.' I said, 'We got a lot of work to do, you know. I'm in a panic.' And he said to me, 'Who's gonna put up a card when we have five minutes to go, so I can start "My Way"? Put him in a red shirt so I can see him.'

    "We start the show, and we're walking down the aisle and we get to the curtain where his music is supposed to start, and he turned to me and he said, 'Jerry, you look white as a sheet.' I said, 'I'm scared to death.' And he looked up and he pinched my cheek, and he said to me, 'Don't worry about it, pal. You got me into this and I am gonna get you out of it.' "

    With more than 20,000 people inside the arena and a second live audience stretching from Nova Scotia to Rio de Janeiro, Frank Sinatra put on a landmark performance. John Rockwell of the New York Times summed up the press reaction when he called the show "superb," the audience "rapturous," and the singer "master of his generation."


    October 13, 1974: On his way to the
    ring at Madison Square Garden to tape
    "The Main Event."


    PRODUCER GEORGE SCHLATTER ON FRANK SINATRA: Frank himself is an event. He's more than a singer, more than a person. There is that energy he exudes. He's one of our national treasures. Anywhere you go in the world, when you talk about America, they know Coca-Cola, they know the Statue of Liberty, they know Sinatra. And yet, with all of that, there is an innocence to him. He loves cherry bombs. He loves birthdays. He loves Christmas. He's patriotic. And he loves to laugh!

    OCTOBER 2–29, 1974: Frank launched a nine-city Eastern tour with bandleader Woody Herman and his Young Thundering Herd.

    OCTOBER 13, 1973: With Dinah Shore, FS co-hosted the Friars Club roast of Milton Berle on the occasion of Berle's 60th anniversary in show business.

    OCTOBER 13, 1970: Seattle's KIRO topped all previous radio Sinatrathons with 71 consecutive hours of Sinatra music.

    OCTOBER 13, 1957: With Louis Armstrong and Rosemary Clooney, Dad guested on his friend Bing Crosby's Edsel Show.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  8. #6888
    "So," he said, "we won't go to the same place twice."
    Classic!!
    Pack a small bag....

  9. 'Don't worry about it, pal. You got me into this and I am gonna get you out of it.'
    Another good one.

  10. A worthy addition, 59 years ago:

    OCTOBER 13, 1958: Capitol Records album Frank Sings for Only the Lonely, in its third week on Billboard's "Best Selling LP's" chart, hit Number 1. It would remain on that chart for 120 weeks!

    VVN Music —> Vintage Video #1's: Frank Sinatra Sings For Only the Lonely
    uDisvover Music —> reDiscover 'Frank Sinatra Sings For Only The Lonely'

    Bob.
    Last edited by Bob in Boston; 10-14-2017 at 02:52 PM. Reason: UDiscover link

  11. #6891

    14 October

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    OCTOBER 14–24, 1982: Resorts International in Atlantic City.

    OCTOBER 12–18, 1981: Engagements at Kansas City's Municipal Auditorium, Wichita's Century Two Convention Hall, Houston's Jones Hall, New Orleans' Municipal Auditorium, and a benefit performance at the Carousel Ball in Denver for the Diabetes Association.

    OCTOBER 13–27, 1979: Another short concert tour to New Haven, Providence, Portland (Maine), Montreal, Buffalo, and Binghamton, then back to Resorts International in Atlantic City.

    OCTOBER 14–22, 1978: Back to New York for a week at Radio City Music Hall.

    OCTOBER 14–16, 1977: He attended three games of the World Series at Dodger Stadium. Arriving for dinner at Patsy's Restaurant in New York after a losing game, Frank was informed—cautiously—that the upstairs dining room was packed solid with Yankees, celebrating their victory over the Dodgers. FS said, "Good. Tell them the British are coming." He encountered Bucky Dent, who stood speechless. "Kid, you cost me a lot of money," Dad said, "but you played a great game." To Lou Piniella: "You're Barbara's favorite. She says you're cute." To Mickey Rivers: "Man, you have got to be the kookiest cat in the outfield." To Billy Martin: "You did a great job in managing these monkeys to victory." Joseph Scognamillo, the restaurant's proprietor, wrote: "Nancy, we all know your father's a winner. But he's also a good loser. He treated the whole Yankee team to dinner."

    OCTOBER 7-20, 1976: His tour took him to Hartford, Binghamton, Pittsburgh, Providence, New Haven, Montreal, Syracuse, Norfolk, and Richmond.

    OCTOBER 2–29, 1974: Frank launched a nine-city Eastern tour with bandleader Woody Herman and his Young Thundering Herd.

    OCTOBER 14, 1957: Released two weeks after his last album, the soundtrack album from Pal Joey, with music by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart, included: "The Lady Is a Tramp," "I Could Write a Book," "There's a Small Hotel," and "I Didn't Know What Time It Was."

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  12. #6892

    15 October

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    OCTOBER 14–24, 1982: Resorts International in Atlantic City.

    OCTOBER 12–18, 1981: Engagements at Kansas City's Municipal Auditorium, Wichita's Century Two Convention Hall, Houston's Jones Hall, New Orleans' Municipal Auditorium, and a benefit performance at the Carousel Ball in Denver for the Diabetes Association.

    OCTOBER 13–27, 1979: Another short concert tour to New Haven, Providence, Portland (Maine), Montreal, Buffalo, and Binghamton, then back to Resorts International in Atlantic City.

    OCTOBER 14–22, 1978: Back to New York for a week at Radio City Music Hall.

    OCTOBER 14–16, 1977: He attended three games of the World Series at Dodger Stadium. Arriving for dinner at Patsy's Restaurant in New York after a losing game, Frank was informed—cautiously—that the upstairs dining room was packed solid with Yankees, celebrating their victory over the Dodgers. FS said, "Good. Tell them the British are coming." He encountered Bucky Dent, who stood speechless. "Kid, you cost me a lot of money," Dad said, "but you played a great game." To Lou Piniella: "You're Barbara's favorite. She says you're cute." To Mickey Rivers: "Man, you have got to be the kookiest cat in the outfield." To Billy Martin: "You did a great job in managing these monkeys to victory." Joseph Scognamillo, the restaurant's proprietor, wrote: "Nancy, we all know your father's a winner. But he's also a good loser. He treated the whole Yankee team to dinner."

    OCTOBER 7-20, 1976: His tour took him to Hartford, Binghamton, Pittsburgh, Providence, New Haven, Montreal, Syracuse, Norfolk, and Richmond.

    OCTOBER 2–29, 1974: Frank launched a nine-city Eastern tour with bandleader Woody Herman and his Young Thundering Herd.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  13. #6893
    Quote Originally Posted by Ace917 View Post
    "Nancy, we all know your father's a winner. But he's also a good loser. He treated the whole Yankee team to dinner."
    class
    Robert

  14. #6894

    16 October

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    OCTOBER 16–20 AND NOVEMBER 5, 1984: FS went to Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Hartford, Westchester, New York City, Washington, D.C., Sacramento, and San Diego for Republican receptions and fundraisers for President Reagan.


    On the campaign trail with the President
    and First Lady. [White House photo]

    OCTOBER 14–24, 1982: Resorts International in Atlantic City.

    OCTOBER 12–18, 1981: Engagements at Kansas City's Municipal Auditorium, Wichita's Century Two Convention Hall, Houston's Jones Hall, New Orleans' Municipal Auditorium, and a benefit performance at the Carousel Ball in Denver for the Diabetes Association.

    OCTOBER 13–27, 1979: Another short concert tour to New Haven, Providence, Portland (Maine), Montreal, Buffalo, and Binghamton, then back to Resorts International in Atlantic City.

    OCTOBER 14–22, 1978: Back to New York for a week at Radio City Music Hall.

    OCTOBER 14–16, 1977: He attended three games of the World Series at Dodger Stadium. Arriving for dinner at Patsy's Restaurant in New York after a losing game, Frank was informed—cautiously—that the upstairs dining room was packed solid with Yankees, celebrating their victory over the Dodgers. FS said, "Good. Tell them the British are coming." He encountered Bucky Dent, who stood speechless. "Kid, you cost me a lot of money," Dad said, "but you played a great game." To Lou Piniella: "You're Barbara's favorite. She says you're cute." To Mickey Rivers: "Man, you have got to be the kookiest cat in the outfield." To Billy Martin: "You did a great job in managing these monkeys to victory." Joseph Scognamillo, the restaurant's proprietor, wrote: "Nancy, we all know your father's a winner. But he's also a good loser. He treated the whole Yankee team to dinner."

    OCTOBER 7-20, 1976: His tour took him to Hartford, Binghamton, Pittsburgh, Providence, New Haven, Montreal, Syracuse, Norfolk, and Richmond.

    OCTOBER 2–29, 1974: Frank launched a nine-city Eastern tour with bandleader Woody Herman and his Young Thundering Herd.

    OCTOBER 16, 1967: Filming began in New York for The Detective.

    OCTOBER 16, 1965: Frank hosted The Hollywood Palace and performed a spectacular 20-minute mini-concert with Count Basie.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  15. #6895

    17 October

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    OCTOBER 16–20 AND NOVEMBER 5, 1984: FS went to Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Hartford, Westchester, New York City, Washington, D.C., Sacramento, and San Diego for Republican receptions and fundraisers for President Reagan.

    OCTOBER 14–24, 1982: Resorts International in Atlantic City.

    OCTOBER 12–18, 1981: Engagements at Kansas City's Municipal Auditorium, Wichita's Century Two Convention Hall, Houston's Jones Hall, New Orleans' Municipal Auditorium, and a benefit performance at the Carousel Ball in Denver for the Diabetes Association.

    OCTOBER 13–27, 1979: Another short concert tour to New Haven, Providence, Portland (Maine), Montreal, Buffalo, and Binghamton, then back to Resorts International in Atlantic City.

    OCTOBER 14–22, 1978: Back to New York for a week at Radio City Music Hall.

    OCTOBER 7-20, 1976: His tour took him to Hartford, Binghamton, Pittsburgh, Providence, New Haven, Montreal, Syracuse, Norfolk, and Richmond.

    OCTOBER 17-23, 1975: Back to Harrah's at Lake Tahoe.

    OCTOBER 2–29, 1974: Frank launched a nine-city Eastern tour with bandleader Woody Herman and his Young Thundering Herd.

    OCTOBER 17, 1961: He surprised his friend Sammy with a brief walkon during his pal's run at the Sands Hotel in Las Vegas. Sammy would forget about the time and remain on stage too long, keeping the audiences away from the gambling tables. The casino bosses turned to Dad for help, and he tried various means to compel Sammy to shorten his show. One was an alarm clock placed on a stool on the stage. Another time he called Sammy on the backstage telephone during his show. Nothing seemed to work. One night Dad was in Las Vegas and got called down by the stage manager. Sammy was 40 minutes over. Frank got two six-foot-six-inch security guards who picked little Sammy up right there on the stage. My father took the microphone and said, "We're a little late. Good night, folks." And they all left the stage, three walking and one off the ground.

    OCTOBER 17, 1956: Dad was one of many major stars in cameo roles—his was as a honky-tonk piano player—in the Mike Todd extravaganza, Around the World in 80 Days. Marlene Dietrich also appeared in the scene with him. During the filming, he befriended one of the stars, young Shirley MacLaine, who became a great "buddy" soon afterward.


    Marlene Dietrich ON SINATRA: He is
    the gentlest man I have ever known,
    the Mercedes-Benz of men.

    OCTOBER 17, 1952: He gave a memorable interview to columnist Hy Gardner on Gardner's nationally broadcast radio show.

    OCTOBER 17, 1940: With Dorsey, Dad began a weekly radio show, Fame and Fortune—which was sponsored by Lewis Home Company and was broadcast on NBC for six months from 8:30 to 9 p.m.—that gave amateur songwriters a chance to compete for a $100 prize and the right to see their work published by NBC Music, a company in which Dorsey had an interest. It was also a great clinic for the young singer to hone his craft, challenging him to learn and perform new and different material every week.


    [Photo from collection of Michael Anguti–
    courtesy of Paramount Pictures Corp.]

    FRANK ON DEVELOPING HIS OWN STYLE AS A SINGER: It was in 1940 that I really began developing a style of my own. Tommy didn't work much with me. He devoted his time to the musicians and the arrangements, so that left me on my own to experiment. The thing that influenced me most was the way Tommy played his trombone. He would take a musical phrase and play it all the way through seemingly without breathing for 8, 10, maybe 16 bars. How in the hell did he do it? I used to sit behind him on the bandstand and watch, trying to see him sneak a breath. But I never saw the bellows move in his back. His jacket didn't even move. So I edged my chair around to the side a little and peeked around to watch him. Finally, after a while, I discovered that he had a "sneak pinhole" in the corner of his mouth—not an actual hole, but a tiny place he left open where he was breathing. In the middle of a phrase, while the tone was still being carried through the trombone, he'd go "shhhhh" and take a quick breath and play another four bars with that breath.

    Fascinated, I began listening to other soloists. I bought every Jascha Heifetz record I could find and listened to his constant bowing, where you never heard a break, carrying the melody line straight on through just like Dorsey's trombone. Why couldn't a singer do that too? I decided to make my voice work in the same way as a trombone or violin—not sounding like them, but "playing" the voice like those instruments. The first thing I needed was extraordinary breath control, so I began swimming in public pools, taking laps under water and thinking song lyrics to myself as I swam, holding my breath. Over six months or so, I began to develop and delineate a method of long phraseology. Instead of singing only two bars or four bars at a time—like most of the other guys around—I was able to sing six bars, and in some songs eight bars, without taking a visible or audible breath. That gave the melody a flowing, unbroken quality, and that's what made me sound different. When I started singing that way, people began taking notice.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
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  16. OCTOBER 17, 1956: Dad was one of many major stars in cameo roles—his was as a honky-tonk piano player—in the Mike Todd extravaganza, Around the World in 80 Days. Marlene Dietrich also appeared in the scene with him.
    Video clip of this scene is in the Filmography:

    —> Frank Sinatra Film - Around The World In 80 Days 1956 United Artists

    Bob.

  17. #6897

    18 October

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    OCTOBER 18, 1987: Frank appeared at a benefit at the Las Vegas Convention Center for the 75th anniversary of the United Way.

    OCTOBER 18, 1986: During the Princess Grace Foundation weekend, he performed at the Third Annual Arts Awards gala benefit at the Anatole Hotel in Dallas, Texas.

    OCTOBER 16–20 AND NOVEMBER 5, 1984: FS went to Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Hartford, Westchester, New York City, Washington, D.C., Sacramento, and San Diego for Republican receptions and fundraisers for President Reagan.

    OCTOBER 14–24, 1982: Resorts International in Atlantic City.

    OCTOBER 12–18, 1981: Engagements at Kansas City's Municipal Auditorium, Wichita's Century Two Convention Hall, Houston's Jones Hall, New Orleans' Municipal Auditorium, and a benefit performance at the Carousel Ball in Denver for the Diabetes Association.

    OCTOBER 13–27, 1979: Another short concert tour to New Haven, Providence, Portland (Maine), Montreal, Buffalo, and Binghamton, then back to Resorts International in Atlantic City.

    OCTOBER 14–22, 1978: Back to New York for a week at Radio City Music Hall.

    OCTOBER 7-20, 1976: His tour took him to Hartford, Binghamton, Pittsburgh, Providence, New Haven, Montreal, Syracuse, Norfolk, and Richmond.

    OCTOBER 17-23, 1975: Back to Harrah's at Lake Tahoe.

    OCTOBER 2–29, 1974: Frank launched a nine-city Eastern tour with bandleader Woody Herman and his Young Thundering Herd.

    OCTOBER 18, 1957: Frank Sinatra debuted in The Frank Sinatra Show, a series of 21 one-hour musicals and 10 half-hour dramas on Friday nights on ABC television. Among his all-star roster of guests were such friends as Bob Hope, Peggy Lee, Kim Novak, Dean Martin, Bing Crosby, Dinah Shore, Robert Mitchum, Sammy Davis, Eddie Fisher, Ethel Merman, Joey Bishop, Ella Fitzgerald, and Natalie Wood. The second show was to be the television debut of my nine-year-old sister, Tina, but she was too frightened to appear and I replaced her. Chesterfield Cigarettes and Bulova Watch Company signed up as sponsors. At the time, it was the most expensive half-hour in television history, and Dad set an ambitious schedule, shooting nine half-hour shows in just 15 working days. "One Friday I'll be a singer," he told Newsweek, "and another Friday I'll be an actor. If any bad mistakes are made, I want to be responsible for them." The financial aspects of the lucrative deal were widely publicized, and critics complained that the show appeared "unrehearsed." When reviewers wrote that the show looked "canned," Dad replied, "If they want audience reaction, I'll film the shows before an audience, the same as I Love Lucy. But I'm not going to gimmick up the show. I loathe phony soundtracks and canned applause. I'd rather quit than submit to them." Reviews for the series were disappointing, ratings were low, and it was canceled after a single season. The Frank Sinatra Show was the last TV series he ever tried.



    The Frank Sinatra Show, an ambitious, big-budget series of one-hour musicals and half-hour dramas on ABC in 1957, showcased Dad's multiple talents, but the ratings and reviews didn't live up to audience expectations or his own.
    Though it lasted only a season, the stellar list of guests who appeared on it made The Frank Sinatra Show worth watching.




    Singing with Peggy Lee; Clowning with Bing and Dean; Like father, like son: Frank Sr. and Jr.



    Scheduled for her TV debut, little Tina was OK during the dress rehearsal, but her last-minute
    attack of stage fright forced me to sub for her on the show—in my school clothes.

    TINA ON HER FATHER'S FAME: I was 9 or 10 before I realized he was somebody. I don't know why. I knew he was famous, but still I always wondered why people stared at me when I was with him. Finally I asked and he said, "They're not staring at you, Pigeon. They're staring at me."

    OCTOBER 18, 1952: Frank made an appearance on Jimmy Durante's All Star Revue.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

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