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Thread: Today in Frank Sinatra history

  1. #7601

    4 January

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    JANUARY 4–9, 1987: He was in Hawaii to guest star in an episode of the CBS series Magnum, P.I., which aired February 25.


    Dad had a great time in Hawaii working
    on this episode of Magnum P.I. In one
    of his best performances, he played a
    former cop whose granddaughter was
    brutally murdered.

    JANUARY 1–6, 1986: Frank vacationed in Gstaad, Switzerland.

    JANUARY 3–9, 1980: He kicked off the year at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

    DECEMBER 29, 1978–JANUARY 7, 1979: Dad worked through the New Year's holiday at the Sunrise Musical Theater in Fort Lauderdale. Then he and Barbara flew to Barbados for a brief vacation.

    JANUARY 4, 1971: FS performed at a gala in Los Angeles to celebrate the election of Ronald Reagan as governor of California.

    JANUARY 4, 1949: Dad recorded 27 songs for Columbia [in 1949]—among them "Some Enchanted Evening" and "Just a Kiss Apart." In this Hollywood recording session, he sang "Kisses and Tears"—this version was unreleased—and "If You Stub Your Toe on the Moon."

    DECEMBER 18, 1940–JANUARY 14, 1941: Frank Sinatra returned to New York with the [Tommy Dorsey] band for a second big run at the Paramount.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  2. #7602

    5 January

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    JANUARY 4–9, 1987: He was in Hawaii to guest star in an episode of the CBS series Magnum, P.I., which aired February 25.

    JANUARY 1–6, 1986: Frank vacationed in Gstaad, Switzerland.

    JANUARY 3–9, 1980: He kicked off the year at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

    DECEMBER 29, 1978–JANUARY 7, 1979: Dad worked through the New Year's holiday at the Sunrise Musical Theater in Fort Lauderdale. Then he and Barbara flew to Barbados for a brief vacation.

    JANUARY 5–FEBRUARY 1, 1966: Frank Sinatra and Count Basie at the Sands in Las Vegas. Ten shows were recorded and edited by Reprise and later released as Sinatra at the Sands, arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones. The songs included "I've Got You Under My Skin," "September of My Years," "You Make Me Feel So Young," "Luck Be a Lady," "It Was a Very Good Year," "My Kind of Town," "One for My Baby," "Fly Me to the Moon," "Angel Eyes," "Where or When," "Come Fly with Me," and more. It won the Grammy for Stan Cornyn's liner notes.

    JANUARY 5, 1944: Still holding on to his weekly Hit Parade gig, Dad ended Songs by Sinatra and hopscotched to still another half-hour weekly CBS radio series: The Frank Sinatra Show, a stylish starring vehicle emceed by comedian Jerry Lester with unconventional guest stars such as Metropolitan Opera basso profundo Lauritz Melchior and Rita Stearns, a Washington, D.C., high school senior who penned a winning 50-word essay on what "The Voice" meant to her.


    "Do you mind waiting a few minutes,
    Henry? I'm listening to Frank Sinatra."

    DECEMBER 18, 1940–JANUARY 14, 1941: Frank Sinatra returned to New York with the [Tommy Dorsey] band for a second big run at the Paramount.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  3. #7603

    6 January

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    JANUARY 6, 1994: Attended memorial service for Irving "Swifty" Lazar at the Westwood Village Memorial Park.

    JANUARY 4–9, 1987: He was in Hawaii to guest star in an episode of the CBS series Magnum, P.I., which aired February 25.

    JANUARY 1–6, 1986: Frank vacationed in Gstaad, Switzerland.

    JANUARY 6–12, 1983: Dad returned to Caesars Palace.

    JANUARY 3–9, 1980: He kicked off the year at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

    DECEMBER 29, 1978–JANUARY 7, 1979: Dad worked through the New Year's holiday at the Sunrise Musical Theater in Fort Lauderdale. Then he and Barbara flew to Barbados for a brief vacation.

    JANUARY 6, 1977: [See Grandma's Mountain]

    JANUARY 5–FEBRUARY 1, 1966: Frank Sinatra and Count Basie at the Sands in Las Vegas. Ten shows were recorded and edited by Reprise and later released as Sinatra at the Sands, arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones. The songs included "I've Got You Under My Skin," "September of My Years," "You Make Me Feel So Young," "Luck Be a Lady," "It Was a Very Good Year," "My Kind of Town," "One for My Baby," "Fly Me to the Moon," "Angel Eyes," "Where or When," "Come Fly with Me," and more. It won the Grammy for Stan Cornyn's liner notes.

    JANUARY 6, 1958: Come Fly with Me hit number one on the charts with songs like "Isle of Capri," "Moonlight in Vermont," "Autumn in New York," "Let's Get Away from it All," and "Blue Hawaii." (The stereo version of Come Fly with Me​ was not released until nearly four years later, in late 1961, due to technical defects in the stereo recording.) This was the first time he actually worked with arranger Billy May. The last song they were recording one night was "The Road to Mandalay." They went through it, and when they did "And the dawn comes up like thunder—Bong—outta China... 'cross the bay," percussionist Lou Singer hit the gong cue with gusto. Billy May remembered, "That gong was big, like the one on the J. Arthur Rank movie logo. And when Lou hit it, it rang and rang. When Frank heard it the first time he said, 'Yeah! Let me hear it again.' BONNGGG... He said, 'Yeah, Billy. Let's end it with the gong—and let the mother ring!'"



    FRANK JR. ON THE NEW SOUNDS: I can remember when Come Fly with Me was released... waking up after this album had been shipped to the disc jockeys in L.A. and—during traffic hour, which is the biggest sales time on radio—I can remember the morning disc jockey at the top station in town playing the whole side of this album and saying, "We’ll be back with the second side of this new Sinatra album after this commercial." Played the whole side of one album—and during traffic hour! Nobody did that.

    DECEMBER 18, 1940–JANUARY 14, 1941: Frank Sinatra returned to New York with the [Tommy Dorsey] band for a second big run at the Paramount.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  4. #7604

    7 January

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    JANUARY 7, 1989: Frank, Lucille Ball, and Jerry Weintraub chaired the JINSA/Roast/Tribute to Sonny Golden at the Century Plaza in Los Angeles.

    JANUARY 4–9, 1987: He was in Hawaii to guest star in an episode of the CBS series Magnum, P.I., which aired February 25.

    JANUARY 6–12, 1983: Dad returned to Caesars Palace.

    JANUARY 7–13, 1982: During an engagement at Caesars Palace, my father traveled to Los Angeles to attend the wedding of Dean Paul Martin to Dorothy Hamill on the 8th. On the 10th, he traveled to Palm Springs for a benefit for Temple Isaiah at the Sheraton Plaza.

    JANUARY 3–9, 1980: He kicked off the year at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

    DECEMBER 29, 1978–JANUARY 7, 1979: Dad worked through the New Year's holiday at the Sunrise Musical Theater in Fort Lauderdale. Then he and Barbara flew to Barbados for a brief vacation.

    JANUARY 5–FEBRUARY 1, 1966: Frank Sinatra and Count Basie at the Sands in Las Vegas... [See January 5th]

    JANUARY 7, 1962: He produced and starred in Sergeants 3, his second Summit movie. This one was a tongue-in-cheek remake of Gunga Din with American Indians. Dad, Dean, and Peter played a trio of Army buddies caught up in the Indian wars of the late 1800s. Produced on location near Kanab, Utah, it also featured Sammy Davis Jr., Joey Bishop, Henry Silva, comics Buddy Lester and Sonny King, and Ruta Lee. Dad did his own stunts—even the one where he's being dragged under a wagon while Dean is inside it. Dad said, "I didn't mind the dragging, but what really bothered me was the way Dean kept stomping on my fingers as he was thrown back and forth."

    JANUARY 7, 1952: In the first of only four recording sessions for Columbia this year, Dad sang "I Hear a Rhapsody," "I Could Write a Book," and "Walkin' in the Sunshine," the first two with the Jeff Alexander Choir.

    SAMMY DAVIS JR. ON FRANK'S DECLINING FORTUNES: Around 1952, Frank's career took a nosedive. His radio and television shows were off the air and his record sales began dropping. The Will Mastin Trio, in the meantime, was going great. We were a hit in Hollywood. One day I got a cablegram: THE REVIEWS WERE GREAT. KEEP IT UP. FRANK. Here was a guy with his whole world falling down around him, taking the time to send me his congratulations.

    FRANK JR. ON THE DECLINE OF SINATRA'S RECORDING CAREER: Pop's old-style records—Sinatra singing good music with good arrangements—wasn't working anymore. Meantime, the power structure in the record business was changing, too. Dad's experience was that if you were a bandleader or a solo singer, you had control over what you recorded. Now the word was, "Butt out." The A&R—Artists and Repertoire—man was in charge. At Columbia, that was Mitch Miller. He told Pop to record a song using a washboard. Pop said, "Mitch, really? A washboard?" The song was "Tennessee Newsboy." Pop recorded it.

    DECEMBER 18, 1940–JANUARY 14, 1941: Frank Sinatra returned to New York with the [Tommy Dorsey] band for a second big run at the Paramount.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  5. #7605

    8 January

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    JANUARY 4–9, 1987: He was in Hawaii to guest star in an episode of the CBS series Magnum, P.I., which aired February 25.

    JANUARY 6–12, 1983: Dad returned to Caesars Palace.

    JANUARY 7–13, 1982: During an engagement at Caesars Palace... [See January 7th]

    JANUARY 3–9, 1980: He kicked off the year at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

    JANUARY 5–FEBRUARY 1, 1966: Frank Sinatra and Count Basie at the Sands in Las Vegas... [See January 5th]

    DECEMBER 18, 1940–JANUARY 14, 1941: Frank Sinatra returned to New York with the [Tommy Dorsey] band for a second big run at the Paramount.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  6. #7606

    9 January

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    JANUARY 9, 1993: The Career Achievement Award at the Palm Springs International Film Festival was bestowed on my father at the Riviera Hotel. Preceding the presentation of the award was an hourlong tribute with Robert Wagner serving as master of ceremonies. The tribute chronicled Dad's career through a number of his film clips, including scenes with Laurence Harvey in The Manchurian Candidate, Shirley MacLaine in Some Came Running, and Montgomery Clift in From Here to Eternity. At the ceremony, George Sidney, who directed Dad in two musicals, Pal Joey and Anchors Aweigh, paid him the ultimate compliment: "His first take is better than most people's tenth. He always went for the best and took risks."

    JANUARY 4–9, 1987: He was in Hawaii to guest star in an episode of the CBS series Magnum, P.I., which aired February 25.

    JANUARY 6–12, 1983: Dad returned to Caesars Palace.

    JANUARY 7–13, 1982: During an engagement at Caesars Palace, my father traveled to Los Angeles to attend the wedding of Dean Paul Martin to Dorothy Hamill on the 8th. On the 10th he traveled to Palm Springs for a benefit for Temple Isaiah at the Sheraton Plaza.

    JANUARY 3–9, 1980: He kicked off the year at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

    JANUARY 5–FEBRUARY 1, 1966: Frank Sinatra and Count Basie at the Sands in Las Vegas. Ten shows were recorded and edited by Reprise and later released as Sinatra at the Sands, arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones. The songs included "I've Got You Under My Skin," "September of My Years," "You Make Me Feel So Young," "Luck Be a Lady," "It Was a Very Good Year," "My Kind of Town," "One for My Baby," "Fly Me to the Moon," "Angel Eyes," "Where or When," "Come Fly with Me," and more. It won the Grammy for Stan Cornyn's liner notes.

    JANUARY 9, 1963: Dad flew east to attend Marty and Dolly's 50th wedding anniversary.


    FS at his parents' anniversary dinner.
    He later recalled, "My mother had the
    most musical laugh. She was wonderful."

    JANUARY 9, 1962: Despite their mutual independence, Dad and Juliet Prowse were becoming closer as the months wore on. Time magazine reported that to celebrate their relationship, he took her to a quiet dinner at Romanoff's and slipped an elegantly beautiful diamond ring on the third finger of her left hand. When word of their engagement got out, he said to reporters: "Juliet has been my one romance. I'm 46 now—it's time I settled down."


    Juliet Prowse with Dad in costume at
    the annual Boomtown party benefit
    for SHARE.

    JANUARY 9–10, 12, 16, 1956: With Nelson Riddle, Dad recorded a new album, Songs for Swingin' Lovers!, which included not only "You Make Me Feel So Young," "I Thought About You," "Anything Goes," and "We'll Be Together Again," but also a last-minute number arranged on the way to the studio: "I've Got You Under My Skin." Sinatra fans have voted it the best song he ever sang. It was released in March.

    FRANK JR. ON AN UNFORGETTABLE NIGHT IN THE STUDIO: They'd been told how many songs to put on the album, and they were following instructions. They were supposed to finish the album on Friday night. Thursday, in the middle of the night, the A&R department called Sinatra and said, "We need three more songs for Swingin' Lovers. He says, "This is a helluva time to tell me." He called Nelson, who was living out in Malibu, and woke him up. Told Nelson they need three more arrangements. The next night coming in from Malibu for the final date, Nelson's wife was driving and he was in the back seat with a flashlight still writing out the parts. One of those arrangements was for "I've Got You Under My Skin." At the studio Nelson got up and started to conduct. Nelson Riddle was the kind of a guy, well, a volcano would go up next to him, he'd say, "How about that?" Absolutely unflappable. Now, Nelson conducted the set, and after they'd rehearsed "I've Got You Under My Skin," everybody just sat there. It was an old song, been recorded a thousand times, not a new song, right? But all the women had tears in their eyes and the whole orchestra, when they were done playing, stood up and applauded. For Nelson Riddle. This doesn't happen. But Nelson, he just stood there with cigarette ashes on him and said, "Yeah, how about that?"

    JANUARY 9, 1947: In the new year's opening session at Columbia studios in New York, Frank recorded the first of an incredibly prolific 71 songs he would turn out in 1947. Among them were "Always," "I Concentrate on You," and "My Love for You." The year also produced "Almost Like Being in Love," "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas," "The Nearness of You," "But Beautiful," "All of Me," "Laura," "None but the Lonely Heart," "Fools Rush In," "Body and Soul," and "Autumn in New York."

    DECEMBER 18, 1940–JANUARY 14, 1941: Frank Sinatra returned to New York with the [Tommy Dorsey] band for a second big run at the Paramount.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  7. #7607

    10 January

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    JANUARY 6–12, 1983: Dad returned to Caesars Palace.

    JANUARY 7–13, 1982: During an engagement at Caesars Palace, my father traveled to Los Angeles to attend the wedding of Dean Paul Martin to Dorothy Hamill on the 8th. On the 10th he traveled to Palm Springs for a benefit for Temple Isaiah at the Sheraton Plaza.

    JANUARY 10, 1981: He performed at Radio City Music Hall for the benefit of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. He continued doing these concerts for five years, raising enough money for a new wing, which was named for him.

    JANUARY 10–22, 1975: Back at Harrah's in Lake Tahoe.

    JANUARY 5–FEBRUARY 1, 1966: Frank Sinatra and Count Basie at the Sands in Las Vegas. Ten shows were recorded and edited by Reprise and later released as Sinatra at the Sands, arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones. The songs included "I've Got You Under My Skin," "September of My Years," "You Make Me Feel So Young," "Luck Be a Lady," "It Was a Very Good Year," "My Kind of Town," "One for My Baby," "Fly Me to the Moon," "Angel Eyes," "Where or When," "Come Fly with Me," and more. It won the Grammy for Stan Cornyn's liner notes.

    JANUARY 9–10, 12, 16, 1956: With Nelson Riddle, Dad recorded a new album, Songs for Swingin' Lovers!, which included not only "You Make Me Feel So Young," "I Thought About You," "Anything Goes," and "We'll Be Together Again" but also a last-minute number arranged on the way to the studio: "I've Got You Under My Skin." Sinatra fans have voted it the best song he ever sang. It was released in March.

    JANUARY 10, 1944: Dad was on the air in the middle of a radio show broadcast live from Hollywood when Franklin Wayne Emmanuel Sinatra was born at Margaret Hague Hospital 3,000 miles away in Jersey City. The next day, press photographers crowded around my mother's bed to snap close-ups of mother and child. He was named Franklin after President Roosevelt and Emmanuel after his dear friend Manie Sacks. But everybody called my brother Frank Jr.


    Mom holding my newborn baby brother,
    Frank Jr.: "...I wonder what he'll think
    of me; I guess he'll call me the old man.
    I guess he'll think I can lick every other
    fella's father. Well, I can..." (Soliloquy
    from Carousel)

    DECEMBER 18, 1940–JANUARY 14, 1941: Frank Sinatra returned to New York with the [Tommy Dorsey] band for a second big run at the Paramount.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  8. Unringing the bell (one more time)

    Quote Originally Posted by Nancy’s book View Post
    Franklin Wayne Emmanuel Sinatra
    The book can’t be reprinted, but one would hope an online correction can be made in this thread after so many years. See posts:

    —> Unringing the bell (yet again)
    —> Francis Wayne Emmanuel Sinatra

    Bob.

  9. #7609

    11 January

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    JANUARY 11, 1984: FS and Buddy Rich appeared at the Hyatt Regency Houston, Texas, for the Wortham Theater Center Benefit for Arts and Humanities.

    JANUARY 6–12, 1983: Dad returned to Caesars Palace.

    JANUARY 7–13, 1982: During an engagement at Caesars Palace, my father traveled to Los Angeles to attend the wedding of Dean Paul Martin to Dorothy Hamill on the 8th. On the 10th he traveled to Palm Springs for a benefit for Temple Isaiah at the Sheraton Plaza.

    JANUARY 10–22, 1975: Back at Harrah's in Lake Tahoe.

    JANUARY 5–FEBRUARY 1, 1966: Frank Sinatra and Count Basie at the Sands in Las Vegas. Ten shows were recorded and edited by Reprise and later released as Sinatra at the Sands, arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones. The songs included "I've Got You Under My Skin," "September of My Years," "You Make Me Feel So Young," "Luck Be a Lady," "It Was a Very Good Year," "My Kind of Town," "One for My Baby," "Fly Me to the Moon," "Angel Eyes," "Where or When," "Come Fly with Me," and more. It won the Grammy for Stan Cornyn's liner notes.

    DECEMBER 18, 1940–JANUARY 14, 1941: Frank Sinatra returned to New York with the [Tommy Dorsey] band for a second big run at the Paramount.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  10. #7610

    12 January

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    JANUARY 12, 1991: At the American Cinema Awards, Frank presented the Humanitarian Award to Leo Jaffe.

    JANUARY 12, 1985: In New York City, he performed on the Cerebral Palsy Telethon.

    JANUARY 12, 1984: He performed at the Reunion Center in Dallas, Texas.

    JANUARY 6–12, 1983: Dad returned to Caesars Palace.

    JANUARY 7–13, 1982: During an engagement at Caesars Palace, my father traveled to Los Angeles to attend the wedding of Dean Paul Martin to Dorothy Hamill on the 8th. On the 10th, he traveled to Palm Springs for a benefit for Temple Isaiah at the Sheraton Plaza.

    JANUARY 12–18, 1978: Another week at Caesars.

    JANUARY 12, 1977: We joined Dad in a Palm Springs funeral service to bury his beloved mother beside her husband. That moment was almost certainly the most painful one of his life.


    At his mother's funeral.

    JANUARY 12, 1977: My grandmother's funeral was a requiem High Mass at St. Louis's Catholic Church in Cathedral City. Danny Thomas, Dean Martin, and Jilly Rizzo served as pallbearers. His friends and family offered the only comfort my father could find in those dark days

    JANUARY 1977: Dad began a new life. I had trouble coming to grips with the fact that his expressive love for my mother had not led to their remarriage. Finally, I resolved that his affection for her was genuine and would continue forever, yet it took time to understand its depths and limits. But what made things more difficult was that shortly after my grandmother's death, Barbara requested that Dad get his marriage to my mother annulled so they could marry in a Catholic ceremony. I found the concept of annulment shocking, and my brother, sister, and I were concerned about how it would affect our mother.

    JANUARY 10–22, 1975: Back at Harrah's in Lake Tahoe.

    JANUARY 12, 1967: FS hosted a big party at the Eden Roc Hotel in Miami Beach to celebrate the 65th birthday of his friend, boxing great Joe Louis.

    JANUARY 5–FEBRUARY 1, 1966: Frank Sinatra and Count Basie at the Sands in Las Vegas. Ten shows were recorded and edited by Reprise and later released as Sinatra at the Sands, arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones. The songs included "I've Got You Under My Skin," "September of My Years," "You Make Me Feel So Young," "Luck Be a Lady," "It Was a Very Good Year," "My Kind of Town," "One for My Baby," "Fly Me to the Moon," "Angel Eyes," "Where or When," "Come Fly with Me," and more. It won the Grammy for Stan Cornyn's liner notes.

    JANUARY 9–10, 12, 16, 1956: With Nelson Riddle, Dad recorded a new album, Songs for Swingin' Lovers!, which included not only "You Make Me Feel So Young," "I Thought About You," "Anything Goes," and "We'll Be Together Again" but also a last-minute number arranged on the way to the studio: "I've Got You Under My Skin." Sinatra fans have voted it the best song he ever sang. It was released in March.

    JANUARY 12, 1950: In Frank's first concert in two years, in Hartford, Connecticut, Variety announced that the take was his biggest ever: $18,267 for two days.

    DECEMBER 18, 1940–JANUARY 14, 1941: Frank Sinatra returned to New York with the [Tommy Dorsey] band for a second big run at the Paramount.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  11. But what made things more difficult was that shortly after my grandmother's death, Barbara requested that Dad get his marriage to my mother annulled so they could marry in a Catholic ceremony. I found the concept of annulment shocking, and my brother, sister, and I were concerned about how it would affect our mother.
    My mother never went to church again.

  12. I can underatand that, Nancy. Heartless request by Barbara.
    A Nightingale Sang In Berkeley Square

    My favorite song.

  13. #7613

    13 January

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    JANUARY 13, 1991: Frank presented the Scopus Award to Quincy Jones at the Hebrew University Benefit.


    FS and Q with the Scopus Award.

    JANUARY 7–13, 1982: During an engagement at Caesars Palace, my father traveled to Los Angeles to attend the wedding of Dean Paul Martin to Dorothy Hamill on the 8th. On the 10th, he traveled to Palm Springs for a benefit for Temple Isaiah at the Sheraton Plaza.

    JANUARY 12–18, 1978: Another week at Caesars.

    JANUARY 10–22, 1975: Back at Harrah's in Lake Tahoe.

    JANUARY 5–FEBRUARY 1, 1966: Frank Sinatra and Count Basie at the Sands in Las Vegas. Ten shows were recorded and edited by Reprise and later released as Sinatra at the Sands, arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones. The songs included "I've Got You Under My Skin," "September of My Years," "You Make Me Feel So Young," "Luck Be a Lady," "It Was a Very Good Year," "My Kind of Town," "One for My Baby," "Fly Me to the Moon," "Angel Eyes," "Where or When," "Come Fly with Me," and more. It won the Grammy for Stan Cornyn's liner notes.

    JANUARY 13, 1963: Footage of Dad's bobby-soxer years was featured on "Teenage Idols," a popular episode of David Wolper's documentary series, Hollywood and the Stars.

    DECEMBER 18, 1940–JANUARY 14, 1941: Frank Sinatra returned to New York with the [Tommy Dorsey] band for a second big run at the Paramount.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  14. #7614

    14 January

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    JANUARY 14–16, 1983: Harrah's in Lake Tahoe.

    JANUARY 12–18, 1978: Another week at Caesars.

    JANUARY 10–22, 1975: Back at Harrah's in Lake Tahoe.

    JANUARY 14, 1970: Frank appeared as a guest on NBC's Dinah Shore Show.

    JANUARY 5–FEBRUARY 1, 1966: Frank Sinatra and Count Basie at the Sands in Las Vegas. Ten shows were recorded and edited by Reprise and later released as Sinatra at the Sands, arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones. The songs included "I've Got You Under My Skin," "September of My Years," "You Make Me Feel So Young," "Luck Be a Lady," "It Was a Very Good Year," "My Kind of Town," "One for My Baby," "Fly Me to the Moon," "Angel Eyes," "Where or When," "Come Fly with Me," and more. It won the Grammy for Stan Cornyn's liner notes.

    JANUARY 14, 1957: Cancer claimed the life of Humphrey Bogart, and Dad was so grieved that he couldn't do his show at the Copa that night, saying, "I'm afraid I wouldn't be coherent." Friends Sammy Davis Jr. and Jerry Lewis filled in for him in sold-out performances with Marlene Dietrich and Joe DiMaggio in the audience.

    DECEMBER 18, 1940–JANUARY 14, 1941: Frank Sinatra returned to New York with the [Tommy Dorsey] band for a second big run at the Paramount.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  15. #7615

    15 January

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    JANUARY 14–16, 1983: Harrah's in Lake Tahoe.

    JANUARY 15, 1978: Frank appeared on Gene Kelly's TV special, taped at the Ambassador Auditorium in Pasadena, California.

    JANUARY 12–18, 1978: Another week at Caesars.

    JANUARY 15–21, 1976: He kicked off the new year with a week at Caesars, recording the final night's shows. He recorded three of the songs two weeks later in the studio: "I Sing the Songs," "Empty Tables," and "Send in the Clowns."

    JANUARY 10–22, 1975: Back at Harrah's in Lake Tahoe.

    JANUARY 15, 1971: Dad realized a dream: the Martin Anthony Sinatra Medical Education Center in Palm Springs, for which he had raised the funds. At its dedication, he evoked the memory of Marty, his late father: "He's here," Dad said, pointing to his head. "And here," he added, pointing to his heart, "and this splendid structure is my dad's kind of dream, just as it is yours and mine. I remember a line in a childhood prayer that said, 'Send me blessed dreams and let them all come true.'" Governor Reagan of California spoke, too, and added to the thought of dreams. He said that two parents once invested their dreams in their son. "They saw the dreams come true, beyond anything they could have hoped. Then the son gave it back to them. Frank, you are living proof that life does begin when you begin to serve." The tears turned to laughter when Dr. Dan Kaplan made Frank an honorary staff member of the hospital. The gesture was probably unnecessary, said Dr. Kaplan, because "Frank's been operating for years."


    Governor and Mrs. Ronald Reagan, Vice
    President Spiro Agnew, Dolly, and Frank
    cutting the ribbon on the medical
    building dedicated to my grandfather.

    JANUARY 5–FEBRUARY 1, 1966: Frank Sinatra and Count Basie at the Sands in Las Vegas. Ten shows were recorded and edited by Reprise and later released as Sinatra at the Sands, arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones. The songs included "I've Got You Under My Skin," "September of My Years," "You Make Me Feel So Young," "Luck Be a Lady," "It Was a Very Good Year," "My Kind of Town," "One for My Baby," "Fly Me to the Moon," "Angel Eyes," "Where or When," "Come Fly with Me," and more. It won the Grammy for Stan Cornyn's liner notes.

    JANUARY 15, 1962: My father was one of the pallbearers at the funeral of a friend, the comedy genius Ernie Kovacs.

    JANUARY 15–17, 1962: He turned out 12 songs for the All Alone album. Among them: "The Song Is Ended," "What'll I Do?," "When I Lost You," and the poignant "Are You Lonesome Tonight?" If you have this album and haven't thought about it for a long time, play it now. It's one of the best. Dad and I were in Palm Springs sitting at the bar one night listening to a "Sinatrathon" on the radio. The DJ introduced "What'll I Do," saying, "This is for the dark times, the short hours." My father listened to himself for a while, "What'll I do with just a photograph to tell my troubles to..." and he said quietly, "That was tough to do. I couldn't do that anymore. It takes great control." When you listen to "When I Lost You," remember that the day it was recorded, my Dad had just been a pallbearer for Ernie Kovacs.


    JANUARY 15–28, 1958: FS played two weeks at the Sands.

    JANUARY 15, 1956: Giving possibly his best performance, Dad played Frankie Machine, a tormented heroin addict, opposite Kim Novak in Otto Preminger's The Man with the Golden Arm for United Artists. He earned a Best Actor nomination for what critic Arthur Knight called "a truly virtuoso performance," bringing to his character "a shade of sweetness, a sense of edgy indestructibility." It was demanding, a torturous piece of work, the only role he really wanted to play, almost needed to play, since Maggio. The Elmer Bernstein score is without question one of the finest ever written. This avant-garde, black-and-white gem has only one flaw. The entire film was shot on a soundstage and location shooting might have been better. The title, by the way, refers to Machine's card-dealing talent—not the fact that he is a drummer or that he shoots heroin. My favorite scene is the one in the jail cell when Machine, watching a screaming junkie, relives his own horror. My father's face is anguished here, not pretty. It's quite an amazing change.



    Posters and photo from The Man with the Golden Arm, copyright © 1955 by Carlyle Productions.

    FRANK ON THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN ARM: I did some research on my part and for about 40 seconds, through a peephole, I was allowed to see what happens to people when they try to kick heroin cold turkey—a youngster climbing a wall. It was the most frightening thing I've ever seen. I never want to see that again. Never. When we made the film, we wanted to show the real misery that drugs cause, so that people would not want to be involved. I've said this many times, but I thought I won an Oscar for the wrong picture. I thought in all fairness that I should have won it for The Man with the Golden Arm, for which I was nominated. I felt if I ever deserved a prize, it should've been for that picture, because I did the finest work I ever did in my life on that film.

    JANUARY 15, 1955: In a dramatic musical role, Frank delivered a heartfelt performance as a down-and-out songwriter opposite Doris Day in the Warner Bros. musical romance Young at Heart, a remake of the John Garfield film Four Daughters. In addition to the title duet, he sang such wonderful songs as "She's Funny That Way," "Someone to Watch Over Me," and "One for My Baby." This was the first time Dad and Doris worked together since Your Hit Parade in 1949.

    DORIS DAY ON THE REAL SINATRA: Despite Frank's sure and rather cocky exterior, I always felt there was a sad vulnerability about him.

    MID-JANUARY 1955: At 14, I accompanied Dad on a three-week concert tour of Australia. It was exciting. My mom made me a traveling suit in a comfortable navy-checked fabric for the 36 hour flight. My first road trip—halfway around the world. There was a whole troupe of us flying in a BOAC big-bellied Stratocruiser. Frank and company spent much of the flight in the belly of the big plane, because that's where the bar was. There were jam sessions and jokes, and I had the time of my life. The Australians gave Dad a warm, enthusiastic welcome. The audiences were big and very receptive, but the press assaulted him. It was as if they were laying for him! He was criticized, unbelievably, because "nobody swooned." He even was blamed for setting off a false fire alarm. This was my first exposure to the cruelty, inadvertent and intentional, of the press. I hated it. But nothing was going to spoil my vacation with my dad. I had him all to myself.

    I was keeping a diary of the trip and writing letters home every day. One afternoon I ran out of hotel stationery in my bedroom, and I went into Dad's room looking for some. I opened the desk drawer. Inside was some intimate ladies' apparel, belonging, I found out later, to the girl singer on the tour. For the rest of the trip, I was destroyed. I was suddenly deeply saddened. I stopped writing in my little diary. I just didn't care. Dr. William Appleton, in his book Fathers and Daughters, calls this "The Theory of the Fall of Father." He writes, "When a man reveals his humanity to his daughter, when she is old enough to stand it, he actively prepares her for adulthood. By abandoning his role as her hero, he aids her in leaving him." It was time for me to begin growing up. I was badly shaken. And for a long time, I was angry at him. I never spoke with him about the episode. I should have said something right away. My mother finally asked me what was wrong and I told her. I'm sure she explained it to Dad. I couldn't. I was only 14.


    A 14-year-old on my first adult adventure,
    I accompanied my father on a concert
    tour of Australia. It was exciting. Just
    him and me for three whole weeks.

    MID-JANUARY 1944: Dad sang at a benefit for The Jewish Home for the Aged in Los Angeles. One of those who bought tickets was MGM's Louis B. Mayer, who watched while Dad spoke and sang to the elderly. In the first line of one of the songs, "Ol' Man River," he refused to use the traditional line, "Darkies all work on the Mississippi," and sang instead, "Here we all work on the Mississippi." And his rendition of this timeless Kern/Hammerstein classic was so heartfelt that Mayer was extremely moved. "I could see tears in his eyes," Dad recalls. "I guess the way I sang it made him cry. But L.B. turned to an aide and said, 'I want that boy.' Let me tell you something. Mayer was a giant. When he said, 'I want that boy,' he got that boy." Dad would sign with MGM in February.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  16. #7616
    Re: "All Alone": Coincidentally, I just listened to this record a couple of times last week. I said to my wife, "You have to hear this. Frank is in remarkable voice." I had been listening to a collection of live Maria Callas arias and I had been carrying on about the quality of her singing. Switching to this record, I feel confident saying that Frank delivered the same level of quality in his genre as Callas did in hers. This is not a small thing.
    Robert

  17. #7617

    16 January

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    JANUARY 14–16, 1983: Harrah's in Lake Tahoe.

    JANUARY 12–18, 1978: Another week at Caesars.

    JANUARY 15–21, 1976: He kicked off the new year with a week at Caesars, recording the final night's shows. He recorded three of the songs two weeks later in the studio: "I Sing the Songs," "Empty Tables," and "Send in the Clowns."

    JANUARY 10–22, 1975: Back at Harrah's in Lake Tahoe.

    JANUARY 5–FEBRUARY 1, 1966: Frank Sinatra and Count Basie at the Sands in Las Vegas. Ten shows were recorded and edited by Reprise and later released as Sinatra at the Sands, arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones. The songs included "I've Got You Under My Skin," "September of My Years," "You Make Me Feel So Young," "Luck Be a Lady," "It Was a Very Good Year," "My Kind of Town," "One for My Baby," "Fly Me to the Moon," "Angel Eyes," "Where or When," "Come Fly with Me," and more. It won the Grammy for Stan Cornyn's liner notes.

    JANUARY 15–17, 1962: He turned out 12 songs for the All Alone album. Among them: "The Song Is Ended," "What'll I Do?," "When I Lost You," and the poignant "Are You Lonesome Tonight?" If you have this album and haven't thought about it for a long time, play it now. It's one of the best. Dad and I were in Palm Springs sitting at the bar one night listening to a "Sinatrathon" on the radio. The DJ introduced "What'll I Do," saying, "This is for the dark times, the short hours." My father listened to himself for a while, "What'll I do with just a photograph to tell my troubles to..." and he said quietly, "That was tough to do. I couldn't do that anymore. It takes great control." When you listen to "When I Lost You," remember that the day it was recorded, my Dad had just been a pallbearer for Ernie Kovacs.

    JANUARY 15–28, 1958: FS played two weeks at the Sands.

    JANUARY 9–10, 12, 16, 1956: With Nelson Riddle, Dad recorded a new album, Songs for Swingin' Lovers!, which included not only "You Make Me Feel So Young," "I Thought About You," "Anything Goes," and "We'll Be Together Again" but also a last-minute number arranged on the way to the studio: "I've Got You Under My Skin." Sinatra fans have voted it the best song he ever sang. It was released in March.
    January 16th

    JANUARY 16, 1951: He returned to the Texaco Star Theatre for another go-round with Uncle Miltie.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  18. #7618

    17 January

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    JANUARY 17, 1982 In Washington, he attended a benefit for Holocaust crusader Simon Wiesenthal. Two weeks later he hosted the world premiere of the film Genocide at the Kennedy Center.


    Frank and the great Nazi-hunter
    Simon Wiesenthal.

    JANUARY 12–18, 1978: Another week at Caesars.

    JANUARY 15–21, 1976: He kicked off the new year with a week at Caesars, recording the final night's shows. He recorded three of the songs two weeks later in the studio: "I Sing the Songs," "Empty Tables," and "Send in the Clowns."

    JANUARY 10–22, 1975: Back at Harrah's in Lake Tahoe.

    JANUARY 5–FEBRUARY 1, 1966: Frank Sinatra and Count Basie at the Sands in Las Vegas. Ten shows were recorded and edited by Reprise and later released as Sinatra at the Sands, arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones. The songs included "I've Got You Under My Skin," "September of My Years," "You Make Me Feel So Young," "Luck Be a Lady," "It Was a Very Good Year," "My Kind of Town," "One for My Baby," "Fly Me to the Moon," "Angel Eyes," "Where or When," "Come Fly with Me," and more. It won the Grammy for Stan Cornyn's liner notes.

    JANUARY 15–17, 1962: He turned out 12 songs for the All Alone album. Among them: "The Song Is Ended," "What'll I Do?," "When I Lost You," and the poignant "Are You Lonesome Tonight?" If you have this album and haven't thought about it for a long time, play it now. It's one of the best. Dad and I were in Palm Springs sitting at the bar one night listening to a "Sinatrathon" on the radio. The DJ introduced "What'll I Do," saying, "This is for the dark times, the short hours." My father listened to himself for a while, "What'll I do with just a photograph to tell my troubles to..." and he said quietly, "That was tough to do. I couldn't do that anymore. It takes great control." When you listen to "When I Lost You," remember that the day it was recorded, my Dad had just been a pallbearer for Ernie Kovacs.

    JANUARY 15–28, 1958: FS played two weeks at the Sands.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  19. Just listened to ALL ALONE this mornong.
    A Nightingale Sang In Berkeley Square

    My favorite song.

  20. #7620

    18 January

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    JANUARY 1985: Once again, before a political event—this time the presidential inaugural gala—the press attacked Frank Sinatra. The Washington Post dredged up in a rather desperate fashion the old boring, unfounded accusations of Mob connections. And with Dean Martin and Sammy Davis Jr. in town along with a group of Reagan's Hollywood friends, the New Republic, wanting its fair share of the headlines, called it "the Rat Pack inauguration."

    JANUARY 18, 1985: He performed at Vice President George Bush's inaugural program. When asked by reporters about the incidents with the press, Bush said, "Leave him alone. Just leave him alone!" My father finally snapped at one interviewer but spoke to all the disreputable ones when he said, "You're dead. You're all dead for me." When I asked my dad what he meant, he told me, "They simply don't exist for me anymore."

    JANUARY 12–18, 1978: Another week at Caesars.

    JANUARY 15–21, 1976: He kicked off the new year with a week at Caesars, recording the final night's shows. He recorded three of the songs two weeks later in the studio: "I Sing the Songs," "Empty Tables," and "Send in the Clowns."

    JANUARY 10–22, 1975: Back at Harrah's in Lake Tahoe.

    JANUARY 5–FEBRUARY 1, 1966: Frank Sinatra and Count Basie at the Sands in Las Vegas. Ten shows were recorded and edited by Reprise and later released as Sinatra at the Sands, arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones. The songs included "I've Got You Under My Skin," "September of My Years," "You Make Me Feel So Young," "Luck Be a Lady," "It Was a Very Good Year," "My Kind of Town," "One for My Baby," "Fly Me to the Moon," "Angel Eyes," "Where or When," "Come Fly with Me," and more. It won the Grammy for Stan Cornyn's liner notes.

    JANUARY 15–28, 1958: FS played two weeks at the Sands.

    JANUARY 18, 1952: FS appeared as a guest on the Martin and Lewis television show.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

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