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Thread: Today in Frank Sinatra history

  1. #6821

    6 September

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    SEPTEMBER 5-14, 1985: Dad played to sold-out audiences for his entire nine-show engagement at Carnegie Hall. Wrote one critic: "Through subtleties of gesture and of voice - a shift of tone, a way of rushing or delaying the beat - Mr. Sinatra brought to his songs a sense of hard-fought inner drama that made them character studies as well as musical gems."

    SEPTEMBER 3-9, 1979: More shows at Atlantic City's Resorts International.

    AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 6, 1978: A series of one-nighters in the Northeast: the New York State Fair in Syracuse, the Saratoga Performing Arts Center in Saratoga Springs, the Pine Knob Theater in Clarkston, Michigan, and the Garden State Arts Center in Holmdel, New Jersey.

    SEPTEMBER 2-8, 1976: While at Caesars Palace, Frank performed another good deed. He made his usual appearance on Jerry Lewis' Labor Day Telethon for Muscular Dystrophy, singing "Stargazer" and Eric Carmen's "Never Gonna Fall in Love Again." Then, capping three months of elaborate secret planning, he said to Jerry, "Listen, I have a friend who loves what you do every year ... Would you send my friend out, please? Where is he?" Out strolled Jerry's former partner, Dean Martin. The two had not seen or spoken to each other in more than 20 years. As they warmly embraced, Dad said, "I think it's about time, don't you?" To which Jerry replied, wiping away tears, "You son of a bitch." To Dean, Jerry said, "So, how ya been?" And Dean replied, "You know, it seems like we haven't seen each other for 20 years." Then Frank and Dean did a 10-song medley. Afterward, Jerry commented, "When Francis Albert is around, usually there's gonna be excitement."

    SEPTEMBER 4-18, 1974: Dad and Frankie and I played Harrah's in Lake Tahoe and then headed a bill at Caesars in Vegas. It was a family affair, with my mother, Hugh, and A.J. along as well.

    SEPTEMBER 6, 1971: In Paris, Dad accepted the Award of the Century.

    AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 9, 1967: He did two weeks at the Sands, missing three nights because of fatigue.

    SEPTEMBER 6, 1965: Newsweek published a checklist of Dad's enterprises: Artanis ("Sinatra" spelled backward) Productions, which produced None but the Brave; Park Lake Enterprises, which produced Four for Texas and Robin and the 7 Hoods; Reprise Records; and Cal Jet Airways, a charter service.

    AUGUST 23-SEPTEMBER 8, 1963: With Dean and Sammy, he headlined a two-week engagement at the Sands.

    SEPTEMBER 6, 1947: After a two-and-a-half-year hiatus, Dad returned to NBC's Your Hit Parade, this time with Doris Day as a co-star.



    "Doris is so cute," said FS. "She has something wonderful about her style. It kind of bubbles. I love working with her." Doris remembered, "Frank is a wonderful guy to work with. I really owe him so much. Just watching him and working with him is a lot of help to any singer. He's so relaxed, he gave me confidence. He's just the sweetest person I've ever known in the business."

    Over the course of his long run on Your Hit Parade, Frank shared the mike with some wonderful co-stars: Eileen Barton, Beryl Davis, Joan Edwards, Marjorie Hughes, Carol Richards, Bea Wayne, Bonnie Lou Williams, and Eileen Wilson.

    JUNE 16-SEPTEMBER 8, 1942: Following one-nighters at the Forum in Montreal and the Hotel Astor in New York, Frank and the band were booked by CBS as the summer replacement for Red Skelton's popular 30-minute radio show.

    AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 16, 1941: After a Midwestern swing, Dorsey returned East for a third sold-out run at the Paramount in New York. By now Dad was the band's big draw, and he was beginning to think about going solo.

    JULY 2–SEPTEMBER 24, 1940: Impressed with the band's ratings on its Bob Hope replacement show, NBC signed Dorsey to a musical program called Summer Pastime—broadcast on Tuesday nights from New York—that began to elevate Frank Sinatra to a new level of national exposure.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  2. #6822

    7 September

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    SEPTEMBER 5-14, 1985: Dad played to sold-out audiences for his entire nine-show engagement at Carnegie Hall. Wrote one critic: "Through subtleties of gesture and of voice - a shift of tone, a way of rushing or delaying the beat - Mr. Sinatra brought to his songs a sense of hard-fought inner drama that made them character studies as well as musical gems."

    SEPTEMBER 3-9, 1979: More shows at Atlantic City's Resorts International.

    SEPTEMBER 2-8, 1976: While at Caesars Palace, Frank performed another good deed. He made his usual appearance on Jerry Lewis' Labor Day Telethon for Muscular Dystrophy, singing "Stargazer" and Eric Carmen's "Never Gonna Fall in Love Again." Then, capping three months of elaborate secret planning, he said to Jerry, "Listen, I have a friend who loves what you do every year ... Would you send my friend out, please? Where is he?" Out strolled Jerry's former partner, Dean Martin. The two had not seen or spoken to each other in more than 20 years. As they warmly embraced, Dad said, "I think it's about time, don't you?" To which Jerry replied, wiping away tears, "You son of a bitch." To Dean, Jerry said, "So, how ya been?" And Dean replied, "You know, it seems like we haven't seen each other for 20 years." Then Frank and Dean did a 10-song medley. Afterward, Jerry commented, "When Francis Albert is around, usually there's gonna be excitement."

    SEPTEMBER 4-18, 1974: Dad and Frankie and I played Harrah's in Lake Tahoe and then headed a bill at Caesars in Vegas. It was a family affair, with my mother, Hugh, and A.J. along as well.

    AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 9, 1967: He did two weeks at the Sands, missing three nights because of fatigue.

    AUGUST 23-SEPTEMBER 8, 1963: With Dean and Sammy, he headlined a two-week engagement at the Sands.

    JUNE 16-SEPTEMBER 8, 1942: Following one-nighters at the Forum in Montreal and the Hotel Astor in New York, Frank and the band were booked by CBS as the summer replacement for Red Skelton's popular 30-minute radio show.

    AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 16, 1941: After a Midwestern swing, Dorsey returned East for a third sold-out run at the Paramount in New York. By now Dad was the band's big draw, and he was beginning to think about going solo.

    JULY 2–SEPTEMBER 24, 1940: Impressed with the band's ratings on its Bob Hope replacement show, NBC signed Dorsey to a musical program called Summer Pastime—broadcast on Tuesday nights from New York—that began to elevate Frank Sinatra to a new level of national exposure.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  3. #6823

    8 September

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    SEPTEMBER 5-14, 1985: Dad played to sold-out audiences for his entire nine-show engagement at Carnegie Hall. Wrote one critic: "Through subtleties of gesture and of voice - a shift of tone, a way of rushing or delaying the beat - Mr. Sinatra brought to his songs a sense of hard-fought inner drama that made them character studies as well as musical gems."

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1981: He played a two-week engagement with George Shearing at Carnegie Hall. George, who was blind, called Frank "Old Blue Eyes" and himself "Old No Eyes."

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1980: Frank returned to London for memorable concerts at the Royal Festival and Royal Albert Halls. Critic Derek Jewell of the Sunday Times wrote: "Sinatra has become the keeper of the flame for everyone from 40 to 80. His songs distill the youth, the nostalgia of millions. He also happens to be the best at it: an artist of colossal stature. He shapes songs like no one else. That's genius."


    From the stage in London, Frank greets
    close friend Claudette Colbert, who
    wrote: "Frank has had a very special
    corner of my heart for a long time."

    SEPTEMBER 3-9, 1979: More shows at Atlantic City's Resorts International.

    SEPTEMBER 2-8, 1976: While at Caesars Palace, Frank performed another good deed. He made his usual appearance on Jerry Lewis' Labor Day Telethon for Muscular Dystrophy, singing "Stargazer" and Eric Carmen's "Never Gonna Fall in Love Again." Then, capping three months of elaborate secret planning, he said to Jerry, "Listen, I have a friend who loves what you do every year ... Would you send my friend out, please? Where is he?" Out strolled Jerry's former partner, Dean Martin. The two had not seen or spoken to each other in more than 20 years. As they warmly embraced, Dad said, "I think it's about time, don't you?" To which Jerry replied, wiping away tears, "You son of a bitch." To Dean, Jerry said, "So, how ya been?" And Dean replied, "You know, it seems like we haven't seen each other for 20 years." Then Frank and Dean did a 10-song medley. Afterward, Jerry commented, "When Francis Albert is around, usually there's gonna be excitement."

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1975: FS, Count Basie, and Ella Fitzgerald co-headlined for two hugely successful weeks at New York's Uris Theater, grossing more than $1 million. After one show, Dad escorted Jacqueline Onassis to the "21" Club.


    Fitzgerald, Basie, and Sinatra.

    SEPTEMBER 4-18, 1974: Dad and Frankie and I played Harrah's in Lake Tahoe and then headed a bill at Caesars in Vegas. It was a family affair, with my mother, Hugh, and A.J. along as well.

    AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 9, 1967: He did two weeks at the Sands, missing three nights because of fatigue.

    AUGUST 23-SEPTEMBER 8, 1963: With Dean and Sammy, he headlined a two-week engagement at the Sands.

    SEPTEMBER 8, 1942: Dad left the band for good. He had asked Dorsey to let him out of his contract, but Tommy had refused. So he had to ask for help from some influential friends. Over the years, all sorts of outrageous accounts have been told of how he extricated himself from the punitive Dorsey deal—and the stories are as punishing and unfair as that ridiculous contract, which my dad described as a "ratty piece of paper. It called for me to pay him one third of my earnings for as long as I was in the entertainment business."



    FRANK ON GETTING OUT OF THE DORSEY CONTRACT: It began to come out of the ground that my mother went to Tommy or that the racket guys went to Tommy and convinced him that he should let me go. And that's so far afield it's scary. It's incredible.

    BREAKING THE DORSEY CONTRACT: While the band was performing in Washington, D.C., Dad went into Dorsey's dressing room and told him he wanted to leave. Dorsey smiled. "What for?" he asked. "You're doing great with the band and we've got a lot of arrangements for you." Dad said he appreciated all the things Dorsey had done for him, but now he wanted to get on with his career. "I don't think so," said Dorsey, citing the terms of their contract: 43 percent of his professional income for life. Dad replied, "I had a contract with Harry [James], but he took the contract and tore it up and wished me luck." But even when Dad offered to give his boss a year's notice, Dorsey stood firm.

    "I loved and admired the guy," said Dad. "He was a taskmaster and a brilliant musician, and I liked the way he made everybody toe the line. But he was also a man who detested the idea that a member of his orchestra would leave. He wanted the band to be set. I could understand that, because the orchestra was drilled like a platoon and when new men arrived, it meant rehearsing and getting the guy to fit in. But I was earning $150 a week and saw no future."

    To Dorsey's dismay, Dad began going out as a single on weekend gigs. Then Columbia's Manie Sacks helped find him a few bookings. That brought angry letters from Dorsey's attorneys, demanding their share of his earnings as specified in the contract. What happened then has been the subject of rumor and innuendo ever since. "According to legend," says Dad, "I secured my release from Tommy when three men told him out of the sides of their mouths to 'sign or else.' What actually happened was I hired a couple of lawyers to get me out of it." Manie Sacks took Frank to Henry Jaffe, an entertainment attorney whose clients included the American Federation of Radio Artists. Dorsey's manager refused even to discuss the contract with Jaffe until FS had paid him the share called for under their original contract.

    "Do you like broadcasting on NBC?" Jaffe asked Dorsey, referring to the many shows the band had aired on that network. "I like it a lot," said Dorsey. "Well, then," said Jaffe, "how about we talk about Frank Sinatra and we'll see what kind of deal we can make—that is, if you want to continue on radio." When Dorsey still refused to cancel the contract, Jaffe went to Jules Stein, head of MCA, the talent agency, and offered to let them represent Dad, who was then handled by Rockwell-O'Keefe. Jaffe said he'd get the other agency to release Dad if MCA could get Dorsey to make a deal. So Stein had a heart-to-heart chat with Dorsey. After a series of phone calls from Radio Artists officials and recording executives who took Jaffe's threats very seriously, Dorsey was finally persuaded to take $75,000 and some additional bookings through MCA in exchange for letting Frank go. "My end of it cost me something like $25,000," my father recalled. "I hope you fall on your ass," said Dorsey in a parting shot. But Dad's powerful new agents, Sonny Werblin and Norman Weiss, didn't get to be partners in MCA by betting on the wrong client.

    MARIO PUZO ON THE SINATRA/DORSEY LEGEND VS. THE GODFATHER LEGEND: I took something I had heard or read. I can't remember where. I think I just picked it up from one of those gossip columns. It could have been Lee Mortimer. I remember it said that Tommy Dorsey had him all sewn up. I tried to imagine how Frank would feel and think. I constructed a persona based on his legend. I made up the line "I'll make you an offer you can't refuse."

    FRANK, WHEN ASKED IF HE WAS THE SINGER PORTRAYED IN THE GODFATHER: No way!

    JUNE 16-SEPTEMBER 8, 1942: Following one-nighters at the Forum in Montreal and the Hotel Astor in New York, Frank and the band were booked by CBS as the summer replacement for Red Skelton's popular 30-minute radio show.

    AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 16, 1941: After a Midwestern swing, Dorsey returned East for a third sold-out run at the Paramount in New York. By now Dad was the band's big draw, and he was beginning to think about going solo.

    JULY 2–SEPTEMBER 24, 1940: Impressed with the band's ratings on its Bob Hope replacement show, NBC signed Dorsey to a musical program called Summer Pastime—broadcast on Tuesday nights from New York—that began to elevate Frank Sinatra to a new level of national exposure.

    SEPTEMBER 8, 1935: Frank Sinatra's first big break came when he and a local trio who called themselves the Three Flashes auditioned separately for an appearance on Major Bowes and His Original Amateur Hour, a popular radio show broadcast nationwide on NBC from the stage of the Capitol Theater in New York. "They won and I won," said my father, "and when I was accepted, the old man said, 'They're going to be on the show a week from Sunday. Why don't we put you on together and we'll call it the Hoboken Four.'" The brash 19-year-old declared on the air, "I'm Frank, Major. We're looking for jobs. How about it? Everyone that's ever heard us liked us. We think we're pretty good." They sang the Mills Brothers song "Shine"—and racked up the biggest vote in the history of the show, with 40,000 people calling in. Bowes was so impressed that he brought them back several weeks in a row.



    MAJOR BOWES' ORIGINAL AMATEUR HOUR: Broadcasting from the stage of New York's Capitol Theater, Major Bowes and His Original Amateur Hour was a Depression-era phenomenon that capitalized on America's hunger for entertainment. Bowes sifted through legions of aspiring singers and entertainers in tryouts, gonging lame or overlong acts off the stage and singling out the best for his NBC show. "Round and round she goes," the Major would intone, "and where she stops, nobody knows." The "she" was the wheel of fortune, and one of those acts, on September. 8, 1935, was the Hoboken Four, Bowes' own name for a singing group that included Sinatra, Pat Principe, James Petrozelli, and Fred Tamburro (above), who proceeded to bring down the house—and run up the biggest score on the applause meter in the history of the show.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  4. #6824

    9 September

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    SEPTEMBER 9, 1985: FS was interviewed at the Waldorf-Towers by Arlene Francis for her WOR radio show.

    SEPTEMBER 5-14, 1985: Dad played to sold-out audiences for his entire nine-show engagement at Carnegie Hall. Wrote one critic: "Through subtleties of gesture and of voice - a shift of tone, a way of rushing or delaying the beat - Mr. Sinatra brought to his songs a sense of hard-fought inner drama that made them character studies as well as musical gems."

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1981: He played a two-week engagement with George Shearing at Carnegie Hall. George, who was blind, called Frank "Old Blue Eyes" and himself "Old No Eyes."

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1980: Frank returned to London for memorable concerts at the Royal Festival and Royal Albert Halls. Critic Derek Jewell of the Sunday Times wrote: "Sinatra has become the keeper of the flame for everyone from 40 to 80. His songs distill the youth, the nostalgia of millions. He also happens to be the best at it: an artist of colossal stature. He shapes songs like no one else. That's genius."

    SEPTEMBER 3-9, 1979: More shows at Atlantic City's Resorts International.

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1975: FS, Count Basie and Ella Fitzgerald co-headlined for two hugely successful weeks at New York's Uris Theater, grossing more than $1 million. After one show, Dad escorted Jacqueline Onassis to the "21" Club.

    SEPTEMBER 4-18, 1974: Dad and Frankie and I played Harrah's in Lake Tahoe and then headed a bill at Caesars in Vegas. It was a family affair, with my mother, Hugh, and A.J. along as well.

    AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 9, 1967: He did two weeks at the Sands, missing three nights because of fatigue.

    SEPTEMBER 9, 1957: It was reported in Time magazine that Frank Sinatra fired off a telegram to Florida Senator George Smathers of the Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee, accusing Mitch Miller of confessing that he accepted payola in the form of "large sums of money" from songwriters whose songs Miller recorded at Columbia Records. Smathers introduced an amendment to the Federal Communications Act to prevent broadcasters from owning stock in publishing or record companies. It failed to become law.

    SEPTEMBER 9, 1946: When Phil Silvers signed to star at the Copacabana in New York, he planned to appear with Rags Ragland, his buddy and best friend from their early days in burlesque. Sadly, Rags died two weeks before opening night, and Phil was about to go on alone, grieving and distraught, when there came a knock on his dressing room door an hour before curtain time. It was his friend Frank Sinatra, who had worked with him on Rags' routines while they were entertaining the troops in Europe. "Hi," he said, "what do we open with?"


    [Photo: Edward Ozern]

    PHIL SILVERS ON OPENING NIGHT AT THE COPA WITH SINATRA: Frank was in the middle of making a picture in Hollywood, but there he was standing in the doorway. I know Frank—you don't say, "Gee, you came." You play it cool. So I said, "Well, I'll do a few minutes first, and when I touch my tie you appear and we'll do our routines. You know them all." I can't tell you the reaction when he came out and I looked at him and said, "Scram, kid, I work alone." And then the standard jokes like, "I know there's a food shortage, but this is ridiculous," and "The blood bank is two blocks up the street," etc. We proceeded to do an hour and three quarters of material, and at our conclusion received an ovation. But gratitude embarrassed Frank. I looked for him to thank him for this expression of love and friendship, and he was gone—back to Hollywood, where he had caused a two-day delay because of this gesture. But that's Sinatra. You don't thank him. You just lean back and accept it.

    AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 16, 1941: After a Midwestern swing, Dorsey returned East for a third sold-out run at the Paramount in New York. By now Dad was the band's big draw, and he was beginning to think about going solo.

    JULY 2–SEPTEMBER 24, 1940: Impressed with the band's ratings on its Bob Hope replacement show, NBC signed Dorsey to a musical program called Summer Pastime—broadcast on Tuesday nights from New York—that began to elevate Frank Sinatra to a new level of national exposure.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  5. #6825

    10 September

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    SEPTEMBER 5-14, 1985: Dad played to sold-out audiences for his entire nine-show engagement at Carnegie Hall. Wrote one critic: "Through subtleties of gesture and of voice - a shift of tone, a way of rushing or delaying the beat - Mr. Sinatra brought to his songs a sense of hard-fought inner drama that made them character studies as well as musical gems."

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1981: He played a two-week engagement with George Shearing at Carnegie Hall. George, who was blind, called Frank "Old Blue Eyes" and himself "Old No Eyes."

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1980: Frank returned to London for memorable concerts at the Royal Festival and Royal Albert Halls. Critic Derek Jewell of the Sunday Times wrote: "Sinatra has become the keeper of the flame for everyone from 40 to 80. His songs distill the youth, the nostalgia of millions. He also happens to be the best at it: an artist of colossal stature. He shapes songs like no one else. That's genius."

    SEPTEMBER 10–16, 1976: Back to Lake Tahoe with John Denver at Harrah's.

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1975: FS, Count Basie and Ella Fitzgerald co-headlined for two hugely successful weeks at New York's Uris Theater, grossing more than $1 million. After one show, Dad escorted Jacqueline Onassis to the "21" Club.

    SEPTEMBER 4-18, 1974: Dad and Frankie and I played Harrah's in Lake Tahoe and then headed a bill at Caesars in Vegas. It was a family affair, with my mother, Hugh, and A.J. along as well.

    SEPTEMBER 10, 1973: Dad was interviewed on ABCs Wide World of Sports at the Muhammad Ali-Ken Norton heavyweight title bout at the Forum in Inglewood, California.

    SEPTEMBER 10, 1965: Dad appeared with Sammy in a predictable pie-throwing episode of The Soupy Sales Show taped earlier that summer in New York.

    SEPTEMBER 10–30, 1947: Hearst columnist Westbrook Pegler, fueled by Lee Mortimer and the FBI, resumed his attacks on my father, this time raking up the 1938 morals charge of "seducing a woman of good repute," never mentioning that the woman was discredited and the charges dismissed. In addition, Pegler attempted unsuccessfully to link Frank to a rogues' gallery of gangsters that included not only Lucky Luciano but Frank Costello, Joe Adonis, Longie Zwillman, Bugsy Siegel, Meyer Lansky, and Willie Moretti, reputed Mob chief of Bergen County, New Jersey.

    AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 16, 1941: After a Midwestern swing, Dorsey returned East for a third sold-out run at the Paramount in New York. By now Dad was the band's big draw, and he was beginning to think about going solo.

    JULY 2–SEPTEMBER 24, 1940: Impressed with the band's ratings on its Bob Hope replacement show, NBC signed Dorsey to a musical program called Summer Pastime—broadcast on Tuesday nights from New York—that began to elevate Frank Sinatra to a new level of national exposure.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  6. SEPTEMBER 10, 1965: Dad appeared with Sammy in a predictable pie-throwing episode of The Soupy Sales Show taped earlier that summer in New York.
    Frank Sinatra on TV forum —> The Soupy Sales Show (2006) DVD Box Set
    Dailymotion —> The Soupy Sales Show - Frank Sinatra & Sammy Davis jr - Video
    YouTube —> Soupy Sales Meets the Rat Pack: "The Waiter"

    Bob.

  7. #6827

    11 September

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    SEPTEMBER 5-14, 1985: Dad played to sold-out audiences for his entire nine-show engagement at Carnegie Hall. Wrote one critic: "Through subtleties of gesture and of voice - a shift of tone, a way of rushing or delaying the beat - Mr. Sinatra brought to his songs a sense of hard-fought inner drama that made them character studies as well as musical gems."

    SEPTEMBER 11, 1982: A hospital benefit in Ottawa, Canada, with Rich Little.

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1981: He played a two-week engagement with George Shearing at Carnegie Hall. George, who was blind, called Frank "Old Blue Eyes" and himself "Old No Eyes."

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1980: Frank returned to London for memorable concerts at the Royal Festival and Royal Albert Halls. Critic Derek Jewell of the Sunday Times wrote: "Sinatra has become the keeper of the flame for everyone from 40 to 80. His songs distill the youth, the nostalgia of millions. He also happens to be the best at it: an artist of colossal stature. He shapes songs like no one else. That's genius."

    SEPTEMBER 11–16, 1978: After a brief break, he was back on the road, this time in London for an engagement at the Royal Festival Hall.

    SEPTEMBER 10–16, 1976: Back to Lake Tahoe with John Denver at Harrah's.

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1975: FS, Count Basie, and Ella Fitzgerald co-headlined for two hugely successful weeks at New York's Uris Theater, grossing more than $1 million. After one show, Dad escorted Jacqueline Onassis to the "21" Club.

    SEPTEMBER 4-18, 1974: Dad and Frankie and I played Harrah's in Lake Tahoe and then headed a bill at Caesars in Vegas. It was a family affair, with my mother, Hugh, and A.J. along as well.

    SEPTEMBER 11, 1960: I became Mrs. Tommy Sands. Frank Sinatra gave me away with tears in his eyes. Just before he walked with me down the aisle, he presented me with a pair of star-shaped diamond earrings, "to match the stars in your eyes."



    When I married Tommy Sands, Dad didn't interfere or lecture on the hazards of getting married to a singer. We both, of course, realized the obvious parallels, but this was Hollywood, and I was definitely a Hollywood kid—my feet firmly rooted in celluloid, in glorious Technicolor.

    SEPTEMBER 10–30, 1947: Hearst columnist Westbrook Pegler, fueled by Lee Mortimer and the FBI, resumed his attacks on my father, this time raking up the 1938 morals charge of "seducing a woman of good repute," never mentioning that the woman was discredited and the charges dismissed. In addition, Pegler attempted unsuccessfully to link Frank to a rogues' gallery of gangsters that included not only Lucky Luciano but Frank Costello, Joe Adonis, Longie Zwillman, Bugsy Siegel, Meyer Lansky, and Willie Moretti, reputed Mob chief of Bergen County, New Jersey.

    SEPTEMBER 11, 1945: Putting his convictions on the line, Dad played himself, preaching tolerance to a group of boys in The House I Live In, a 10-minute short for RKO—his last project with that studio—on the theme of racial tolerance: "Look, fellas, religion makes no difference except to a Nazi or somebody as stupid. Why, people all over the world worship God in different ways. This wonderful country is made up of a hundred different kinds of people, and a hundred different ways of talking, and a hundred different ways of going to church. But they're all American ways. My dad came from Italy, but I'm an American. Should I hate your father 'cause he came from Ireland or France or Russia? Wouldn't I be a first-class fathead?" The film was written by Albert Maltz, produced by Frank Ross, and directed by Mervyn LeRoy, but it was Dad's baby from start to finish: It was his idea, he persuaded everyone involved to donate their time and, because he was the star, its message of tolerance was communicated to a lot of people who might not have been inclined to listen otherwise. The proceeds were donated to various charities, and the film won a special Oscar from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.


    A staged shot with the cast of the
    film The House I Live In.


    FRANK ON PREJUDICE: Prejudice is nothing new to me. In Hoboken, when I was a kid, I lived in a tough neighborhood. When somebody called me "a dirty little guinea," there was only one thing to do—break his head. When I got older, I realized you shouldn't do it that way. I realized you've got to do it through education—maybe with a few exceptions.

    ORSON WELLES ON SINATRA'S PRINCIPLES: We drove to his uncle's house for calamari and on the way back we stopped for coffee. Our driver, as it happened, was a black man and the guy in the diner wouldn't serve him. Your dad reached across the counter and grabbed this nine-foot giant by the front of his shirt and said, "You're serving coffee for three." After a beat, the man said, "Yes." No sporting event here. It was a mosquito vs. a gorilla. Frank made the score with sheer force of character.



    Gathering in the Oscar for The House I Live In, FS shares the stage with the actor (later senator) who presented it, George Murphy, and the young actress Peggy Ann Garner. He could not have known how long it would be before he'd hold another Oscar or how important the next one would be to his life, career, and spirits.

    AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 16, 1941: After a Midwestern swing, Dorsey returned East for a third sold-out run at the Paramount in New York. By now Dad was the band's big draw, and he was beginning to think about going solo.

    JULY 2–SEPTEMBER 24, 1940: Impressed with the band's ratings on its Bob Hope replacement show, NBC signed Dorsey to a musical program called Summer Pastime—broadcast on Tuesday nights from New York—that began to elevate Frank Sinatra to a new level of national exposure.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  8. #6828

    12 September

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    SEPTEMBER 5-14, 1985: Dad played to sold-out audiences for his entire nine-show engagement at Carnegie Hall. Wrote one critic: "Through subtleties of gesture and of voice - a shift of tone, a way of rushing or delaying the beat - Mr. Sinatra brought to his songs a sense of hard-fought inner drama that made them character studies as well as musical gems."

    SEPTEMBER 12, 1982: At the Hilton in New York, Frank Sinatra was inducted into the Broadcasters Hall of Fame.

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1981: He played a two-week engagement with George Shearing at Carnegie Hall. George, who was blind, called Frank "Old Blue Eyes" and himself "Old No Eyes."

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1980: Frank returned to London for memorable concerts at the Royal Festival and Royal Albert Halls. Critic Derek Jewell of the Sunday Times wrote: "Sinatra has become the keeper of the flame for everyone from 40 to 80. His songs distill the youth, the nostalgia of millions. He also happens to be the best at it: an artist of colossal stature. He shapes songs like no one else. That's genius."

    SEPTEMBER 11–16, 1978: After a brief break, he was back on the road, this time in London for an engagement at the Royal Festival Hall.

    SEPTEMBER 10–16, 1976: Back to Lake Tahoe with John Denver at Harrah's.

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1975: FS, Count Basie, and Ella Fitzgerald co-headlined for two hugely successful weeks at New York's Uris Theater, grossing more than $1 million. After one show, Dad escorted Jacqueline Onassis to the "21" Club.

    SEPTEMBER 4-18, 1974: Dad and Frankie, and I played Harrah's in Lake Tahoe and then headed a bill at Caesars in Vegas. It was a family affair, with my mother, Hugh, and A.J. along as well.

    SEPTEMBER 12, 1963: Frank Jr., who was all of 19, made his New York professional singing debut at the Americana Hotel. The audience was packed with Sinatra friends and supporters, including Jackie Gleason, Toots Shor, Joe E. Lewis, and Jack E. Leonard. "There isn't one of us that doesn't wish him good luck and perhaps a climb to stardom," wrote critic Louis Sobel in the New York Journal American. "A tribute to his mother," wrote columnist Earl Wilson. Dad, who had his hands full in Nevada and California, missed opening night but finally caught a midweek performance. His glowing review: "The kid sings better than I did at that age."


    Jilly Rizzo, Frank Sr., Frank Jr., and
    friend Frankie Shaw after one of
    Frankie's shows.




    "I've studied with Frank Sinatra," says Frank Jr., "although he doesn't know I've studied with him. I've been following him around all my life." Asked what kind of advice he would give his son about the press, FS answered, "The press? This will get laughs, but I mean it. Be honest and courteous and hope the press reciprocates. I don't mean the entertainer should be subservient, but he should be frank and square. He'll need members of the press all his life. All of us do. In spite of my so-called problems, I've had a damned good press. Frankie should trust individual members until he finds that he can't."

    SEPTEMBER 12, 1963: While in New York, Dad sang "Ol' Man River" at another Carnegie Hall benefit for Martin Luther King's Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Frank Jr., who was sitting in the balcony, recalled, "Here was the greatest black leader in history watching this white man sing a song about slavery, and there were tears on his cheeks."

    SEPTEMBER 10–30, 1947: Hearst columnist Westbrook Pegler, fueled by Lee Mortimer and the FBI, resumed his attacks on my father, this time raking up the 1938 morals charge of "seducing a woman of good repute," never mentioning that the woman was discredited and the charges dismissed. In addition, Pegler attempted unsuccessfully to link Frank to a rogues' gallery of gangsters that included not only Lucky Luciano but Frank Costello, Joe Adonis, Longie Zwillman, Bugsy Siegel, Meyer Lansky, and Willie Moretti, reputed Mob chief of Bergen County, New Jersey.

    SEPTEMBER 12, 1945: The Frank Sinatra Show was revived on CBS radio, this time as a half-hour program with guest stars sponsored by Old Gold cigarettes. It would remain on the air for almost two years.

    SEPTEMBER 12, 1943: Primed and ready to embark on a movie career, Dad signed a seven-year deal with RKO. "If you're a singer and you want to go into the acting business," he recalled years later, "you begin by learning to use the lyric of a song as a script.


    RKO cast Dad in his first important role—playing himself—in the 1943 musical Higher and Higher, which generated not only big box office but also magazine covers and the sales of sheet music for the hottest new singing star in show business.

    AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 16, 1941: After a Midwestern swing, Dorsey returned East for a third sold-out run at the Paramount in New York. By now Dad was the band's big draw, and he was beginning to think about going solo.

    JULY 2–SEPTEMBER 24, 1940: Impressed with the band's ratings on its Bob Hope replacement show, NBC signed Dorsey to a musical program called Summer Pastime—broadcast on Tuesday nights from New York—that began to elevate Frank Sinatra to a new level of national exposure.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  9. I miss both Frank's ---- Sr. and Jr.
    A Nightingale Sang In Berkeley Square

    My favorite song.

  10. #6830

    13 September

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    SEPTEMBER 13, 1988: Interviewed by USA Today.

    SEPTEMBER 13, 1985: After the show at Carnegie Hall, FS received the Italo-American Coalition Entertainer of the Year Award at the Waldorf-Astoria.

    SEPTEMBER 5-14, 1985: Dad played to sold-out audiences for his entire nine-show engagement at Carnegie Hall. Wrote one critic: "Through subtleties of gesture and of voice - a shift of tone, a way of rushing or delaying the beat - Mr. Sinatra brought to his songs a sense of hard-fought inner drama that made them character studies as well as musical gems."

    SEPTEMBER 13, 1984: FS was master of ceremonies at a Friars Club tribute to Dean Martin.

    SEPTEMBER 13, 1982: With Buddy Rich and Charlie Callas at a Carnegie Hall benefit for the World Mercy Fund.

    SEPTEMBER 13–23, 1982: At a Carnegie Hall concert, a young woman who was an admitted fan of rock music was quoted by the New York Times as saying, "Frank Sinatra is one thing I can agree with my parents about. They've been playing his records since I was born, and I don't ordinarily like that kind of music much, but he's a great singer."

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1981: He played a two-week engagement with George Shearing at Carnegie Hall. George, who was blind, called Frank "Old Blue Eyes" and himself "Old No Eyes."

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1980: Frank returned to London for memorable concerts at the Royal Festival and Royal Albert Halls. Critic Derek Jewell of the Sunday Times wrote: "Sinatra has become the keeper of the flame for everyone from 40 to 80. His songs distill the youth, the nostalgia of millions. He also happens to be the best at it: an artist of colossal stature. He shapes songs like no one else. That's genius."

    SEPTEMBER 11–16, 1978: After a brief break, he was back on the road, this time in London for an engagement at the Royal Festival Hall.

    SEPTEMBER 10–16, 1976: Back to Lake Tahoe with John Denver at Harrah's.

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1975: FS, Count Basie, and Ella Fitzgerald co-headlined for two hugely successful weeks at New York's Uris Theater, grossing more than $1 million. After one show, Dad escorted Jacqueline Onassis to the "21" Club.

    SEPTEMBER 4-18, 1974: Dad and Frankie and I played Harrah's in Lake Tahoe and then headed a bill at Caesars in Vegas. It was a family affair, with my mother, Hugh, and A.J. along as well.

    SEPTEMBER 13, 1962: Shooting began on Paramount's screen adaptation of Neil Simon's hit play Come Blow Your Horn. Dad played a devil-may-care lothario—and sang the title song.


    Frank with Barbara Rush in a scene
    from Come Blow Your Horn.

    SEPTEMBER 10–30, 1947: Hearst columnist Westbrook Pegler, fueled by Lee Mortimer and the FBI, resumed his attacks on my father, this time raking up the 1938 morals charge of "seducing a woman of good repute," never mentioning that the woman was discredited and the charges dismissed. In addition, Pegler attempted unsuccessfully to link Frank to a rogues' gallery of gangsters that included not only Lucky Luciano but Frank Costello, Joe Adonis, Longie Zwillman, Bugsy Siegel, Meyer Lansky, and Willie Moretti, reputed Mob chief of Bergen County, New Jersey.

    AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 16, 1941: After a Midwestern swing, Dorsey returned East for a third sold-out run at the Paramount in New York. By now Dad was the band's big draw, and he was beginning to think about going solo.

    JULY 2–SEPTEMBER 24, 1940: Impressed with the band's ratings on its Bob Hope replacement show, NBC signed Dorsey to a musical program called Summer Pastime—broadcast on Tuesday nights from New York—that began to elevate Frank Sinatra to a new level of national exposure.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  11. Frank with Barbara Rush in a scene
    from Come Blow Your Horn.
    I saw the lovely Barbara Rush at a memorial for Robert Osborne and she was still her perky, wonderful self.

  12. #6832

    14 September

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    SEPTEMBER 5-14, 1985: Dad played to sold-out audiences for his entire nine-show engagement at Carnegie Hall. Wrote one critic: "Through subtleties of gesture and of voice - a shift of tone, a way of rushing or delaying the beat - Mr. Sinatra brought to his songs a sense of hard-fought inner drama that made them character studies as well as musical gems."

    SEPTEMBER 13–23, 1982: At a Carnegie Hall concert, a young woman who was an admitted fan of rock music was quoted by the New York Times as saying, "Frank Sinatra is one thing I can agree with my parents about. They've been playing his records since I was born, and I don't ordinarily like that kind of music much, but he's a great singer."

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1981: He played a two-week engagement with George Shearing at Carnegie Hall. George, who was blind, called Frank "Old Blue Eyes" and himself "Old No Eyes."

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1980: Frank returned to London for memorable concerts at the Royal Festival and Royal Albert Halls. Critic Derek Jewell of the Sunday Times wrote: "Sinatra has become the keeper of the flame for everyone from 40 to 80. His songs distill the youth, the nostalgia of millions. He also happens to be the best at it: an artist of colossal stature. He shapes songs like no one else. That's genius."

    SEPTEMBER 11–16, 1978: After a brief break, he was back on the road, this time in London for an engagement at the Royal Festival Hall.

    SEPTEMBER 10–16, 1976: Back to Lake Tahoe with John Denver at Harrah's.

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1975: FS, Count Basie and Ella Fitzgerald co-headlined for two hugely successful weeks at New York's Uris Theater, grossing more than $1 million. After one show, Dad escorted Jacqueline Onassis to the "21" Club.

    SEPTEMBER 4-18, 1974: Dad and Frankie, and I played Harrah's in Lake Tahoe and then headed a bill at Caesars in Vegas. It was a family affair, with my mother, Hugh, and A.J. along as well.

    SEPTEMBER 14, 1956: FS was Edward R. Murrow's guest on his television interview show, Person to Person, filmed at Dad's new Coldwater Canyon home.

    SEPTEMBER 10–30, 1947: Hearst columnist Westbrook Pegler, fueled by Lee Mortimer and the FBI, resumed his attacks on my father, this time raking up the 1938 morals charge of "seducing a woman of good repute," never mentioning that the woman was discredited and the charges dismissed. In addition, Pegler attempted unsuccessfully to link Frank to a rogues' gallery of gangsters that included not only Lucky Luciano but Frank Costello, Joe Adonis, Longie Zwillman, Bugsy Siegel, Meyer Lansky, and Willie Moretti, reputed Mob chief of Bergen County, New Jersey.

    AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 16, 1941: After a Midwestern swing, Dorsey returned East for a third sold-out run at the Paramount in New York. By now Dad was the band's big draw, and he was beginning to think about going solo.

    JULY 2–SEPTEMBER 24, 1940: Impressed with the band's ratings on its Bob Hope replacement show, NBC signed Dorsey to a musical program called Summer Pastime—broadcast on Tuesday nights from New York—that began to elevate Frank Sinatra to a new level of national exposure.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  13. #6833

    15 September

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    SEPTEMBER 15, 1988: Press question-and-answer session with Frank, Liza, and Sammy.


    Dad has known Liza since she was born.
    She calls him Uncle Frank. They tease
    each other about the song "New York,
    New York." Liza constantly reminds Dad,
    "It was written for me."

    SEPTEMBER 15, 1986: Frank attended a memorial service for DJ William B. Williams at the Palace Theater in New York City.

    SEPTEMBER 15, 1985: FS was honored in New York City at the Players Club Pipe Night.

    SEPTEMBER 15, 1982: Princess Grace of Monaco died in an automobile accident. Dad was unable to attend the funeral but he sent the following words of comfort to her family: "...I feel as though the sword of suffering pierced my heart...God is a jealous lover and wanted Grace now. Indeed our hearts are restless until they rest in Him."

    SEPTEMBER 13–23, 1982: At a Carnegie Hall concert, a young woman who was an admitted fan of rock music was quoted by the New York Times as saying, "Frank Sinatra is one thing I can agree with my parents about. They've been playing his records since I was born, and I don't ordinarily like that kind of music much, but he's a great singer."

    SEPTEMBER 15, 1981: He taped a Chrysler commercial and on the same day appeared on Arlene Francis's WOR radio show.

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1981: He played a two-week engagement with George Shearing at Carnegie Hall. George, who was blind, called Frank "Old Blue Eyes" and himself "Old No Eyes."

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1980: Frank returned to London for memorable concerts at the Royal Festival and Royal Albert Halls. Critic Derek Jewell of the Sunday Times wrote: "Sinatra has become the keeper of the flame for everyone from 40 to 80. His songs distill the youth, the nostalgia of millions. He also happens to be the best at it: an artist of colossal stature. He shapes songs like no one else. That's genius."

    SEPTEMBER 11–16, 1978: After a brief break, he was back on the road, this time in London for an engagement at the Royal Festival Hall.

    SEPTEMBER 10–16, 1976: Back to Lake Tahoe with John Denver at Harrah's.

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1975: FS, Count Basie, and Ella Fitzgerald co-headlined for two hugely successful weeks at New York's Uris Theater, grossing more than $1 million. After one show, Dad escorted Jacqueline Onassis to the "21" Club.

    SEPTEMBER 4-18, 1974: Dad and Frankie and I played Harrah's in Lake Tahoe and then headed a bill at Caesars in Vegas. It was a family affair, with my mother, Hugh, and A.J. along as well.

    SEPTEMBER 15–18, 1962: Frank and Dean Martin did four days at the Sands Hotel.

    SEPTEMBER 15, 1954: He did a comedy turn on radio's long-running series, Amos and Andy, which starred his friends Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll. No one, with the exception of Jack Benny, made him laugh as hard.

    SEPTEMBER 10–30, 1947: Hearst columnist Westbrook Pegler, fueled by Lee Mortimer and the FBI, resumed his attacks on my father, this time raking up the 1938 morals charge of "seducing a woman of good repute," never mentioning that the woman was discredited and the charges dismissed. In addition, Pegler attempted unsuccessfully to link Frank to a rogues' gallery of gangsters that included not only Lucky Luciano but Frank Costello, Joe Adonis, Longie Zwillman, Bugsy Siegel, Meyer Lansky, and Willie Moretti, reputed Mob chief of Bergen County, New Jersey.

    AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 16, 1941: After a Midwestern swing, Dorsey returned East for a third sold-out run at the Paramount in New York. By now Dad was the band's big draw, and he was beginning to think about going solo.

    JULY 2–SEPTEMBER 24, 1940: Impressed with the band's ratings on its Bob Hope replacement show, NBC signed Dorsey to a musical program called Summer Pastime—broadcast on Tuesday nights from New York—that began to elevate Frank Sinatra to a new level of national exposure.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  14. Liza looks like her mother.
    A Nightingale Sang In Berkeley Square

    My favorite song.

  15. #6835

    16 September

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    SEPTEMBER 16, 1984: In London, U.S. Ambassador and Mrs. Price held a dinner party honoring Frank and Barbara.

    SEPTEMBER 13–23, 1982: At a Carnegie Hall concert, a young woman who was an admitted fan of rock music was quoted by the New York Times as saying, "Frank Sinatra is one thing I can agree with my parents about. They've been playing his records since I was born, and I don't ordinarily like that kind of music much, but he's a great singer."

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1981: He played a two-week engagement with George Shearing at Carnegie Hall. George, who was blind, called Frank "Old Blue Eyes" and himself "Old No Eyes."

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1980: Frank returned to London for memorable concerts at the Royal Festival and Royal Albert Halls. Critic Derek Jewell of the Sunday Times wrote: "Sinatra has become the keeper of the flame for everyone from 40 to 80. His songs distill the youth, the nostalgia of millions. He also happens to be the best at it: an artist of colossal stature. He shapes songs like no one else. That's genius."

    SEPTEMBER 11–16, 1978: After a brief break, he was back on the road, this time in London for an engagement at the Royal Festival Hall.

    SEPTEMBER 10–16, 1976: Back to Lake Tahoe with John Denver at Harrah's.

    SEPTEMBER 8–20, 1975: FS, Count Basie, and Ella Fitzgerald co-headlined for two hugely successful weeks at New York's Uris Theater, grossing more than $1 million. After one show, Dad escorted Jacqueline Onassis to the "21" Club.

    SEPTEMBER 4-18, 1974: Dad and Frankie and I played Harrah's in Lake Tahoe and then headed a bill at Caesars in Vegas. It was a family affair, with my mother, Hugh, and A.J. along as well.

    SEPTEMBER 16, 1965: Dad appeared as a guest star on the premiere of The Dean Martin Show, a new NBC variety program. Dean was in rare form that night, addressing my father by his new title, "Chairman of the Board." Dad, who had been called a lot of things in his life, was clearly tickled. The title stuck.

    SEPTEMBER 15–18, 1962: Frank and Dean Martin did four days at the Sands Hotel.

    SEPTEMBER 10–30, 1947: Hearst columnist Westbrook Pegler, fueled by Lee Mortimer and the FBI, resumed his attacks on my father, this time raking up the 1938 morals charge of "seducing a woman of good repute," never mentioning that the woman was discredited and the charges dismissed. In addition, Pegler attempted unsuccessfully to link Frank to a rogues' gallery of gangsters that included not only Lucky Luciano but Frank Costello, Joe Adonis, Longie Zwillman, Bugsy Siegel, Meyer Lansky, and Willie Moretti, reputed Mob chief of Bergen County, New Jersey.

    AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 16, 1941: After a Midwestern swing, Dorsey returned East for a third sold-out run at the Paramount in New York. By now Dad was the band's big draw, and he was beginning to think about going solo.

    JULY 2–SEPTEMBER 24, 1940: Impressed with the band's ratings on its Bob Hope replacement show, NBC signed Dorsey to a musical program called Summer Pastime—broadcast on Tuesday nights from New York—that began to elevate Frank Sinatra to a new level of national exposure.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]
    Pack a small bag....

  16. SEPTEMBER 16, 1965:
    Dad appeared as a guest star on the premiere of The Dean Martin Show, a new NBC variety program. Dean was in rare form that night, addressing my father by his new title, "Chairman of the Board." Dad, who had been called a lot of things in his life, was clearly tickled. The title stuck.
    "The title stuck" is an understatement.

  17. #6837
    I've read quite a bit about the title " The Chairman of the Board " I'm sure I'll get the real story now

    1- It came from Shirley Mclaine during the "Rat Pack Era"

    2- Frank Sinatra was called “Chairman of The Board” because he was the Founder & Chairman of Reprise Records. According to his 3rd wife, Barbara Marx-Sinatra,( uggg) Frank disliked the nickname

    3- Which I believe was the 1st I learned and always thought to be true .
    William B Williams nicknamed him Chairman of the Board.

    4- Or was it Dean or he heard it before?

  18. Barbara was his 4th wife

    Nancy
    Ava Garder
    Mia Farrow
    Barbara Marx-Sinatra
    A Nightingale Sang In Berkeley Square

    My favorite song.

  19. #6839
    Quote Originally Posted by carole View Post
    Barbara was his 4th wife

    Nancy
    Ava Garder
    Mia Farrow
    Barbara Marx-Sinatra
    Yea I knew that ,that's not my mistake, but thanks for pointing that out ... Google "who named frank sinatra the chairman of the board"
    And that's the 1st quote in bold print at the top of results
    I added the (uggg)
    Last edited by Mario; 09-16-2017 at 05:58 PM.

  20. Frank himself said it was William B.



    Bob.
    Last edited by Bob in Boston; 09-16-2017 at 09:25 PM. Reason: Added image of Billboard quote.

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