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Thread: Today in Frank Sinatra history

  1. Since its end of Jan, beginning of Feb and 52 years since filming, I think I will watch Oceans 11 today!
    Zac

    "Everything in life is lyrical in it's ideal essence, tragic in it's fate, and comic in it's existence."

  2. #3182

    January 31st

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    JANUARY 31, 1982: Dad participated in a television special entitled Let Poland Be Poland. He said, "I'm not a politician, I'm a singer, but when I see people being forced from their homeland to seek freedom someplace else, it makes me realize all over again how grateful I am for the freedom I have—and how terrible I would feel if I had to leave the country I love. When the troubles began in Poland this winter, I remembered a song I recorded some time ago. It's based on a Polish folk song. I sang it in both English and Polish. If I were a politician I would probably make a speech right now. But since I'm not, here's the song. The title is 'Ever Homeward.'" President Reagan wrote: "An estimated 172 million people in 42 countries saw the production and some 100 million heard it on radio...It was a forum for the champions of human freedom throughout the world. Because of people like you who care, the message will continue to ring loud and clear."

    JANUARY 29–FEBRUARY 4, 1981: Back at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

    JANUARY 25–31, 1974: Sanford Waterman, who had pulled a gun on Frank in 1970, had been indicted for racketeering, so Frank Sinatra was back at Caesars Palace.

    JANUARY 30–FEBRUARY 1, 1967: In three sessions arranged by Claus Ogerman and produced by Sonny Burke, the long-dreamed-of album Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim became a reality. Jobim—the brilliant Brazilian—said of Frank, "This man is Mount Everest for a songwriter. " Stan Cornyn reported that at the sessions, Ogerman "tiptoed about ridding every song of clicks, bings, bips, all things sharp. Seemed like the whole idea was to out-hush each other." My dad said, "I haven't sung so softly since I had laryngitis." Cornyn added, "If he sang any softer, he'd have to be lying on his back." One trombone player, who had put his felt hat across his horn to muffle the sound, said after hitting a clam, "If I blow any softer, it'll have to come out the back of my neck."

    I would be remiss if I didn't mention Jobim's lovely vocals on four of the songs. Cornyn describes "Tone" (Dad's nickname for Antonio) as a "slight and tousled boy-man, speaking softly while about him rushes a world too fast. Antonio, troubled not by the clamor in the world, troubled more by the whisperings in his heart." Frank and Tone communicated quietly, with their eyes, their smiles, their hugs and looks of concern and triumph at what they had accomplished. Lyricist Gene Lees recalled the first time he heard the album: "One of the tracks, a Jobim song called 'Dindi,' sends chills up my arms and back. Sinatra's reading of it is one of the most exquisite ever to come out of American popular music. It is filled with longing. It aches. Somewhere within him Frank Sinatra aches. Fine. That's the way it's always been: The audience's pleasure derives from the artist's pain."

    At the end of the session, the A Team in the studio stepped aside, and Dad let me bring in my B Team to record a duet novelty song called "Somethin' Stupid." On the first take, Dad got silly, sounding his S's like Daffy Duck for fun, so we had to do a second take. Mo Ostin, the president of Reprise, bet him two dollars it would bomb. He lost his money: It went to number one, selling several million copies.

    JANUARY 5–FEBRUARY 1, 1966: Frank Sinatra and Count Basie at the Sands in Las Vegas. Ten shows were recorded and edited by Reprise and later released as Sinatra at the Sands, arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones. The songs included "I've Got You Under My Skin," "September of My Years," "You Make Me Feel So Young," "Luck Be a Lady," "It Was a Very Good Year," "My Kind of Town," "One for My Baby," "Fly Me to the Moon," "Angel Eyes," "Where or When," "Come Fly with Me" and more. It won the Grammy for Stan Cornyn's liner notes.

    JANUARY 23–FEBRUARY 12, 1963: Frank, Dean and Sammy did three weeks at the Sands.

    JANUARY 26–FEBRUARY 13, 1960: The members of the Summit filmed Ocean's Eleven on location in Vegas. It was the first of four films in which they starred together. FS played the ringleader of a gang of former Air Force buddies—including Dean, Sammy, Peter and Joey, along with Richard Conte and Henry Silva—who orchestrate a military-style holdup of five Las Vegas casinos. Of the Summit movies, my father said, "Of course they're not great movies. No one could claim that. We're not setting out to make Hamlet or Gone with the Wind. We gotta make pictures the people enjoy. Entertainment."

    JANUARY 20–31, 1953: Dad returned from Africa [See December 1952] for an engagement at the Latin Quarter nightclub in Boston.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]

  3. JANUARY 31, 1982: Dad participated in a television special entitled Let Poland Be Poland. He said, "I'm not a politician, I'm a singer, but when I see people being forced from their homeland to seek freedom someplace else, it makes me realize all over again how grateful I am for the freedom I have—and how terrible I would feel if I had to leave the country I love. When the troubles began in Poland this winter, I remembered a song I recorded some time ago. It's based on a Polish folk song. I sang it in both English and Polish. If I were a politician I would probably make a speech right now. But since I'm not, here's the song. The title is 'Ever Homeward.'"

    President Reagan wrote: "An estimated 172 million people in 42 countries saw the production and some 100 million heard it on radio...It was a forum for the champions of human freedom throughout the world. Because of people like you who care, the message will continue to ring loud and clear."
    Wonderful!

  4. #3184

    February 1st (Part 1)

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    FEBRUARY 1995: The Frank Sinatra Neckwear Collection was presented at the Magic Man Apparel Show in Las Vegas. Dad, always a snappy dresser with a particular fondness for ties, incorporated designs from his own artwork into the silk jacquard ties, on which his signature was stitched at the tip. "I have always been bewitched by shadows and contrasts," Dad said at the line's unveiling. "A bright bursting orange sun against a twilight blue sky, the rich shadow cast by a simple green leaf."

    FEBRUARY 1995: Dad and Barbara decided to put the Palm Springs compound up for sale. Dad had owned the Palm Springs house since 1954, and it was an important part of my youth. Barbara: "Palm Springs has changed. We had a wonderful time there, and it's been a fabulous part of our lives. But it's time to move on. We're very happy now. We have two fabulous homes and lots of friends near us. I don't care what kind of possessions you have in life. It really doesn't mean anything unless you have good friends. And everybody is in the L.A. area now."


    At the Palm Springs estate, each guest
    living area had a name. There was the
    "New York, New York" house. Dad's
    painting studio was called, "All the Way."
    "The Tender Trap" was the guest house
    built for President Kennedy. A screening
    room was appropriately named, "Send in
    the Clowns," and "My Way" was the office.

    FEBRUARY 1994: Duets went multiplatinum.

    FEBRUARY 1985: In Miami Beach for the Miracle Ball benefit for St. Jude's Children's Research Center.

    JANUARY 29–FEBRUARY 4, 1981: Back at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

    FEBRUARY 1–8, 1978: Frank returned to Caesars for another week.

    FEBRUARY 1977: Returning to New York, he was at Media Sound with Charles Calello, recording "Everybody Ought to Be in Love," among other songs.

    FEBRUARY 1976: The Friars Club selected Frank Sinatra as Top Box Office Name of the Century.

    FEBRUARY 1975: Frank was given the prestigious Cecil B. DeMille Award by the Hollywood Foreign Press at their annual Golden Globes ceremony, which he could not attend. My sister, Tina, accepted the award from Joan Crawford.

    FEBRUARY 1974: George Burns and several other guests celebrated Jack Benny's 80th birthday at Frank's house in Palm Springs.

    EARLY FEBRUARY 1970: Dad attended a Democratic National Committee tribute to Harry Truman in Miami Beach.

    FEBRUARY 1968: FS hosted an 82nd birthday party in Miami for his old friend Mike Romanoff.

    JANUARY 30–FEBRUARY 1, 1967: In three sessions arranged by Claus Ogerman and produced by Sonny Burke, the long-dreamed-of album Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim became a reality. Jobim—the brilliant Brazilian—said of Frank, "This man is Mount Everest for a songwriter. " Stan Cornyn reported that at the sessions, Ogerman "tiptoed about ridding every song of clicks, bings, bips, all things sharp. Seemed like the whole idea was to out-hush each other." My dad said, "I haven't sung so softly since I had laryngitis." Cornyn added, "If he sang any softer, he'd have to be lying on his back." One trombone player, who had put his felt hat across his horn to muffle the sound, said after hitting a clam, "If I blow any softer, it'll have to come out the back of my neck."

    I would be remiss if I didn't mention Jobim's lovely vocals on four of the songs. Cornyn describes "Tone" (Dad's nickname for Antonio) as a "slight and tousled boy-man, speaking softly while about him rushes a world too fast. Antonio, troubled not by the clamor in the world, troubled more by the whisperings in his heart." Frank and Tone communicated quietly, with their eyes, their smiles, their hugs and looks of concern and triumph at what they had accomplished. Lyricist Gene Lees recalled the first time he heard the album: "One of the tracks, a Jobim song called 'Dindi,' sends chills up my arms and back. Sinatra's reading of it is one of the most exquisite ever to come out of American popular music. It is filled with longing. It aches. Somewhere within him Frank Sinatra aches. Fine. That's the way it's always been: The audience's pleasure derives from the artist's pain."

    At the end of the session, the A Team in the studio stepped aside, and Dad let me bring in my B Team to record a duet novelty song called "Somethin' Stupid." On the first take, Dad got silly, sounding his S's like Daffy Duck for fun, so we had to do a second take. Mo Ostin, the president of Reprise, bet him two dollars it would bomb. He lost his money: It went to number one, selling several million copies.

    JANUARY 5–FEBRUARY 1, 1966: Frank Sinatra and Count Basie at the Sands in Las Vegas. Ten shows were recorded and edited by Reprise and later released as Sinatra at the Sands, arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones. The songs included "I've Got You Under My Skin," "September of My Years," "You Make Me Feel So Young," "Luck Be a Lady," "It Was a Very Good Year," "My Kind of Town," "One for My Baby," "Fly Me to the Moon," "Angel Eyes," "Where or When," "Come Fly with Me" and more. It won the Grammy for Stan Cornyn's liner notes.

    FEBRUARY 1, 1966: Frank guested on Sammy and His Friends, an ABC television special.

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1965: Frank headlined with his old friend Joe E. Lewis in a two-week stand at the Eden Roc Hotel in Miami.

    JANUARY 23–FEBRUARY 12, 1963: Frank, Dean and Sammy did three weeks at the Sands.

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1961: Dad performed to packed houses for every show of a two week run at the Sands in Las Vegas.

    JANUARY 26–FEBRUARY 13, 1960: The members of the Summit filmed Ocean's Eleven on location in Vegas. It was the first of four films in which they starred together. FS played the ringleader of a gang of former Air Force buddies—including Dean, Sammy, Peter and Joey, along with Richard Conte and Henry Silva—who orchestrate a military-style holdup of five Las Vegas casinos. Of the Summit movies, my father said, "Of course they're not great movies. No one could claim that. We're not setting out to make Hamlet or Gone with the Wind. We gotta make pictures the people enjoy. Entertainment."

  5. #3185

    February 1st (Part 2)

    FEBRUARY 1960: Joseph P. Kennedy, U.S. ambassador to England during World War II and father of Jack Kennedy, met with Dad to ask for his help in West Virginia, where JFK had to win the primary election in order to win the Democratic nomination for president. Since anti-Catholic sentiment ran high among voters there, the senior Kennedy suggested that my father ask Sam Giancana for help in swinging the election; if JFK won West Virginia, he would be considered an electable candidate despite his religion. My father approached Giancana, an old acquaintance, making it clear that this was a personal favor to him and not a quid pro quo with the Kennedys, and Giancana dispatched the 500 Club's Skinny D'Amato to get local sheriffs and powerful coal miners' unions to deliver 120,000 votes—and the election—to Kennedy. Dad and his closest friends—Sammy, Dean and Peter Lawford—proceeded to campaign for JFK throughout the country. In Jersey City, where Dolly Sinatra's name still opened doors, Frank enlisted the aid of Mayor John V. Kenny to swing the state party apparatus behind JFK's nomination.

    FEBRUARY 1, 1958: Dad did a guest spot on Dean Martin's Club Oasis television show sponsored by Oasis cigarettes, joining Dean in a duet of "Jailhouse Rock."

    FEBRUARY 1958: Co-starring with Tony Curtis and Natalie Wood in Kings Go Forth for United Artists, FS was on location in France playing a World War II infantry lieutenant who comes home an amputee. Boris Karloff worked as Dad's unofficial acting coach while he was making this movie. He gave him advice that became invaluable: "You must learn to act with your voice as well as your face."

    FEBRUARY 1957: Hearst Broadway columnist and CBS television personality Dorothy Kilgallen wrote a six-part series, "The Real Frank Sinatra Story," that purported to tell "heretofore unpublished episodes in Frankie's life." There was little new and even less substance in what came off as a typically mean-spirited hatchet job. Dad responded by taking personal digs at the columnist in his nightclub act. He even sent Kilgallen a tombstone with her name carved on it. That was too much even for some Sinatra admirers, including columnist Louis Sobol, who wrote that his response to her attacks was "in bad taste" and "inexcusable." But Dad would publicly criticize Kilgallen for the rest of her life. And having been a victim of similar hatchet jobs myself, I can understand why he chose to finally fight back with the only forum he had, his microphone. I wish he had acted on these attacks much earlier.

    FEBRUARY 1955: Reliving his own personal heartbreak, Dad recorded one of his best albums, In the Wee Small Hours, including poignant interpretations of "I'll Be Around," "I Get Along Without You Very Well" and "When Your Lover Has Gone." This is my favorite album. From the liner notes: "Standing in front of the mike with his hands nearly always jammed into his pockets, his shoulders hunched a little forward, he sang. And as he sang, he created the loneliest early-morning mood in the world." Stan Cornyn later recalled, "For all his crashing self-assertion, through his art he was suggesting that man is still only a child, frightened and whimpering in the dark." He would record 36 other songs that year at the Capitol studios in Hollywood and New York. Among them: "Love and Marriage" and "(Love Is) The Tender Trap."

    FEBRUARY 1949: Dad's version of "Some Enchanted Evening" was panned by Downbeat for a lack of intimacy and "a few off-pitch" notes. And his next release, "Bali Ha'i," fared even worse: "For all his talent," wrote the Downbeat reviewer, "it very seldom comes to life."

    FEBRUARY 1949: Ava wrote about running into Frank again at a party in Palm Springs. This time the sparks really began to fly. "I suppose we were rushing things a little the last time we met," he said. "You were rushing things," she replied. "Let's start again," he suggested. "What are you doing now?" "That night we did not kiss or make a date," remembered Ava. "But we knew, and I think it must have frightened both of us." Back in Hollywood, they went on another date. "We went to a little yellow house in Nichols Canyon and made love. And, oh, God, it was magic. We became lovers eternally," she said years later. I believe Ava truly loved my father. She never married again!

    FEBRUARY 1947: FS was continuing his radio show Songs by Sinatra—sponsored by Old Gold cigarettes—in New York on Wednesday nights.

    FEBRUARY 1947: With Harry Truman elevated to the presidency by the death of FDR, Republicans launched an early campaign to oust the lame-duck president and regain the White House by smearing prominent Democratic campaign contributors—including, once again, my father. In the right-wing Hearst and Scripps-Howard papers, columnist Robert Ruark and Dad's nemesis Lee Mortimer accused Frank of sinister motives for being in Cuba with Luciano and the Fischetti brothers. They even printed a ludicrous story that he carried $2,000,000 in small bills on a plane from Miami to Havana and was to deliver it personally to Luciano. And columnist Westbrook Pegler—who Dad later described as "a man with clout"—soon revived the old charges that Frank Sinatra was a Communist "fellow traveler."

    In internal memos to and from FBI Associate Director Clyde Tolson during this same period—released many years later under the Freedom of Information Act—it became clear that unofficial "cooperation" had been offered privately to Mortimer by the FBI, and that much of its own file on Sinatra, in turn, was based on unsupported accusations and innuendos passed along to the agency by Mortimer without any corroboration. Most of the charges, however, came from "leaks" by Harry Anslinger of the National Narcotics Bureau, who had denounced my father as a dangerous "pinko" because of his vocal support for civil rights, his roots in the Sicilian community and his many friendships with "dope-smoking" musicians. So began another myth.

    FEBRUARY–MARCH 1946: Beginning with this first session at the Columbia studio in Hollywood, Dad began the busiest year in his recording history, logging 57 songs. Many were memorable—"That Old Black Magic," "They Say It's Wonderful," "The Girl That I Marry," "September Song" and "Begin the Beguine."

    FEBRUARY 1944: With MCA as his new agency, Dad signed a $1.5 million longterm contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, pre-empting his deal with RKO. Columnist Walter Winchell wrote that Sinatra's salaries from various sources made him the highest-paid person in the world.

    FEBRUARY 1, 1940: At the RCA studios in Chicago, Dad recorded his first two songs with the Dorsey band, "The Sky Fell Down" and "Too Romantic."

    FEBRUARY 1939: A 23-year-old unknown, Frank had been planning to sign on with a band run by Bob Chester—bandleader of one of the groups that played at the Rustic Cabin. Frank said, "In those days, working with a big band was the end of the rainbow for any singer who wanted to make it." My mother got a 15-dollar advance on her salary so Dad could have publicity pictures taken to give to trumpeter Harry James, who had just left Benny Goodman, the "King of Swing," to start a band of his own. Harry Schuchman said: "I remember that day. He had the pictures taken but he couldn't get to Harry James. So he got someone to put them on Harry's desk." Soon afterward James happened to hear Dad on the radio. Already knowing what Frank looked like from the pictures, James then went to see him live at the Rustic Cabin. When James showed up, Frank sang "Begin the Beguine." James said later that he "liked Frank's way of talking a lyric" and signed him up as male vocalist with his newly formed band—a two-year contract at $75 a week.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]

  6. #3186

    February 2nd

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    JANUARY 29–FEBRUARY 4, 1981: Back at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

    FEBRUARY 2, 1980: The University of Santa Clara in Northern California established a $250,000 trust fund for a proposed Frank Sinatra Chair in Music and Theater Arts. It was "one of the nicest things that ever happened to me in my show business career," my father said at a benefit concert in Santa Clara. He said he had performed "in some places that didn't even give me a chair to sit on."

    FEBRUARY 1–8, 1978: Frank returned to Caesars for another week.

    FEBRUARY 2, 1965: Flying into L.A. from Miami for the day, Dad spoke at a Beverly Hilton dinner honoring Associated Press correspondent Jim Bacon, one of the reporters on hand when he and Ava returned from Mexico in 1951 and their car and reporter William Eccles collided, creating a furor. With tongue planted firmly in cheek, he faced his adversaries and said, "I want to thank you for the privilege of appearing here. I think it is only fitting that I be invited to speak to a gathering of newspapermen, considering the marvelous relationship I have always had with the press. I believe in certain quarters of the Hearst empire I am known as the Eichmann of song. Now, many of you might have heard that I have in the past been harmful and brutal to members of the Fourth Estate. These are lies, vicious rumors started by a few disgruntled reporters I happened to run down with my car."

    My father continued to expound on a subject that had long mystified and fascinated him: women. "Women, I've never met a man in my life who could give another man advice about women...I'm supposed to have a Ph.D. on the subject, but I've flunked more often than not. I'm very fond of women; I admire them. But, like all men, I don't understand them. Sex? There's not enough quantity and certainly not enough quality...If I'd had as many affairs as you fellas claim, I'd be speaking to you today from a jar in the Harvard Medical School."

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1965: Frank headlined with his old friend Joe E. Lewis in a two-week stand at the Eden Roc Hotel in Miami.

    JANUARY 23–FEBRUARY 12, 1963: Frank, Dean and Sammy did three weeks at the Sands.

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1961: Dad performed to packed houses for every show of a two week run at the Sands in Las Vegas.

    JANUARY 26–FEBRUARY 13, 1960: The members of the Summit filmed Ocean's Eleven on location in Vegas. It was the first of four films in which they starred together. FS played the ringleader of a gang of former Air Force buddies—including Dean, Sammy, Peter and Joey, along with Richard Conte and Henry Silva—who orchestrate a military-style holdup of five Las Vegas casinos. Of the Summit movies, my father said, "Of course they're not great movies. No one could claim that. We're not setting out to make Hamlet or Gone with the Wind. We gotta make pictures the people enjoy. Entertainment."

    FEBRUARY 2–8, 1940: When the Dorsey band opened at the Lyric Theatre in Indianapolis, the theater's ad in the Indianapolis Star listed Tommy's name in inch-high letters. At the bottom, in 1/8-inch type, was a listing for "Frank Sinatra, Romantic Virtuoso."

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]

  7. Quote Originally Posted by SinatraFan View Post

    FEBRUARY 2–8, 1940: When the Dorsey band opened at the Lyric Theatre in Indianapolis, the theater's ad in the Indianapolis Star listed Tommy's name in inch-high letters. At the bottom, in 1/8-inch type, was a listing for "Frank Sinatra, Romantic Virtuoso."
    "Romantic Virtuoso". That's awesome. That actually just made my day.

  8. #3188

    February 3rd

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    FEBRUARY 3–4, 1989: Frank Sinatra Celebrity Golf Invitational-Benefit for Desert Hospital, at the Canyon Country Club in Palm Springs.

    FEBRUARY 3–9, 1983: Again at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

    FEBRUARY 3, 1982: In Detroit at Cobo Arena.

    JANUARY 29–FEBRUARY 4, 1981: Back at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

    FEBRUARY 3, 1980: Dad shared the stage with Dean Martin at L.A.'s Shrine Auditorium in another fund-raiser for Ronald Reagan.

    FEBRUARY 1–8, 1978: Frank returned to Caesars for another week.

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1965: Frank headlined with his old friend Joe E. Lewis in a two-week stand at the Eden Roc Hotel in Miami.

    JANUARY 23–FEBRUARY 12, 1963: Frank, Dean and Sammy did three weeks at the Sands.

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1961: Dad performed to packed houses for every show of a two week run at the Sands in Las Vegas.

    JANUARY 26–FEBRUARY 13, 1960: The members of the Summit filmed Ocean's Eleven on location in Vegas. It was the first of four films in which they starred together. FS played the ringleader of a gang of former Air Force buddies—including Dean, Sammy, Peter and Joey, along with Richard Conte and Henry Silva—who orchestrate a military-style holdup of five Las Vegas casinos. Of the Summit movies, my father said, "Of course they're not great movies. No one could claim that. We're not setting out to make Hamlet or Gone with the Wind. We gotta make pictures the people enjoy. Entertainment."

    FEBRUARY 2–8, 1940: When the Dorsey band opened at the Lyric Theatre in Indianapolis, the theater's ad in the Indianapolis Star listed Tommy's name in inch-high letters. At the bottom, in 1/8-inch type, was a listing for "Frank Sinatra, Romantic Virtuoso."

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]

  9. #3189

    February 4th

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    FEBRUARY 3–4, 1989: Frank Sinatra Celebrity Golf Invitational-Benefit for Desert Hospital, at the Canyon Country Club in Palm Springs.

    FEBRUARY 3–9, 1983: Again at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

    JANUARY 29–FEBRUARY 4, 1981: Back at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

    FEBRUARY 1–8, 1978: Frank returned to Caesars for another week.

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1965: Frank headlined with his old friend Joe E. Lewis in a two-week stand at the Eden Roc Hotel in Miami.

    JANUARY 23–FEBRUARY 12, 1963: Frank, Dean and Sammy did three weeks at the Sands.

    FEBRUARY 4, 1962: He made an appearance on ABC's The Stan Freberg Show.

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1961: Dad performed to packed houses for every show of a two week run at the Sands in Las Vegas.

    JANUARY 26–FEBRUARY 13, 1960: The members of the Summit filmed Ocean's Eleven on location in Vegas. It was the first of four films in which they starred together. FS played the ringleader of a gang of former Air Force buddies—including Dean, Sammy, Peter and Joey, along with Richard Conte and Henry Silva—who orchestrate a military-style holdup of five Las Vegas casinos. Of the Summit movies, my father said, "Of course they're not great movies. No one could claim that. We're not setting out to make Hamlet or Gone with the Wind. We gotta make pictures the people enjoy. Entertainment."

    FEBRUARY 4, 1959: Some Came Running was released. Though panned by the critics, the film played to large and enthusiastic audiences, and Shirley MacLaine was nominated for her first Academy Award as the sweet, dumb floozy Ginny Moorhead.




    Poster and photo from the MGM motion picture release Some Came Running.

    FEBRUARY 4, 1943: Columbia Pictures' Reveille with Beverly, Dad's first film without the Dorsey band, was released. Though it was only a cameo part—singing "Night and Day"—the timing couldn't have been more perfect to spread the word from coast to coast about America's teenage idol.

    FEBRUARY 2–8, 1940: When the Dorsey band opened at the Lyric Theatre in Indianapolis, the theater's ad in the Indianapolis Star listed Tommy's name in inch-high letters. At the bottom, in 1/8-inch type, was a listing for "Frank Sinatra, Romantic Virtuoso."

    FEBRUARY 4, 1939: With his problems behind him for the moment, Frank Sinatra married Nancy Barbato at Our Lady of Sorrows Church in Jersey City, with both families attending. As a wedding present, he gave her the record of a song dedicated to her—that he had recorded privately the day before: "Our Love." After a reception at the Barbato home, they honeymooned in their three-room, third-floor walkup on Garfield Avenue—for $42 a month—and Dad resumed his gig at the Rustic Cabin, where he had just received a raise to $25 a week. And he landed a nightly gig in Manhattan on The WNEW Dance Parade and partnered with guitarist Tony Mottola on a 15-minute, five-day-weekly radio show, Blue Moon. Nancy, meanwhile, went to work as a secretary for $25 a week at American Type Founders in Elizabeth, New Jersey. During Dad's rare moments at home, she said, "He was handy around the house, putting up towel racks and hanging curtains for me. We really had fun in our first home." And Dad recalls, "In Nancy I found beauty, warmth and understanding; being with her was my only escape from what seemed to be a grim world."





    NANCY SR. ON THE WEDDING: We'd been going together for four and a half years, and we were ready to get married. Frank gave me his own sentimental little wedding present—a bag of jellybeans with a diamond watch inside. When the big day finally came, there were maybe 50 members of the family on each side of the aisle. They had all given us furniture for our new apartment. Frank was in a cutaway tuxedo. I was wearing my sister's wedding dress, and the ring—a gold band with a cluster of diamonds—had been his mother's. I don't think I'd ever seen Frank so happy in his whole life.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]

  10. #3190

    February 5th

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    FEBRUARY 3–9, 1983: Again at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

    FEBRUARY 5, 1981: Dad returned to Washington, D.C., for President Reagan's 70th birthday celebration at the White House.

    FEBRUARY 1–8, 1978: Frank returned to Caesars for another week.

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1965: Frank headlined with his old friend Joe E. Lewis in a two-week stand at the Eden Roc Hotel in Miami.

    JANUARY 23–FEBRUARY 12, 1963: Frank, Dean and Sammy did three weeks at the Sands.

    FEBRUARY 5–6, 1962: The production company was in New York filming climactic scenes for The Manchurian Candidate at Madison Square Garden.

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1961: Dad performed to packed houses for every show of a two week run at the Sands in Las Vegas.

    JANUARY 26–FEBRUARY 13, 1960: The members of the Summit filmed Ocean's Eleven on location in Vegas. It was the first of four films in which they starred together. FS played the ringleader of a gang of former Air Force buddies—including Dean, Sammy, Peter and Joey, along with Richard Conte and Henry Silva—who orchestrate a military-style holdup of five Las Vegas casinos. Of the Summit movies, my father said, "Of course they're not great movies. No one could claim that. We're not setting out to make Hamlet or Gone with the Wind. We gotta make pictures the people enjoy. Entertainment."

    FEBRUARY 2–8, 1940: When the Dorsey band opened at the Lyric Theatre in Indianapolis, the theater's ad in the Indianapolis Star listed Tommy's name in inch-high letters. At the bottom, in 1/8-inch type, was a listing for "Frank Sinatra, Romantic Virtuoso."

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]

  11. #3191

    February 6th

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    FEBRUARY 3–9, 1983: Again at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

    FEBRUARY 1–8, 1978: Frank returned to Caesars for another week.

    FEBRUARY 6–7, 1976: Producer George Schlatter: "We did a TV show with him and John Denver. I put together the longest medley I have ever done, which was a look back musically at the career of FS. Behind Frank and John there were three huge screens, all intertwined with projectors—his whole career would be projected on these screens. And in front of him there were guys from the Harry James band on one side, the Tommy Dorsey band on the other side, the Nelson Riddle orchestra in the center and Basie in front. A hundred musicians. And top to bottom, it was a 14-minute medley. I said, 'We're going to do this in one take, and I want it rehearsed. I want the band here at twelve o'clock, ready to rehearse. Frank's not on call till one, but I want to know everybody's there.'

    "They're all there and we got the sound balanced, and at 12:30 Frank walks in—half an hour early—and says, 'How long am I gonna have to wait?' And I said, 'Nelson?' And Nelson played the medley. And Frank said, 'That sounds pretty good.' I said, 'Would you like to sing that once?' He said, 'Yeah, of course I'd like to sing it once.' So he and John sang the medley. And Frank said, 'What are we gonna do now?' I said, 'Well, you don't need it, but John needs to rehearse again, 'cause these are new songs to him.' And so they ran through the medley again, and Frank says to me, 'Well, what time do we do this?' I said, 'The audience is coming at seven o'clock.' He said, 'Damn. What do you think, why don't we do it at six?' I said, 'Hey, that sounds good to me.' He said, 'No, really.' So we went around and got an audience together. And now we're ready to go. And you've got to understand, there's a hundred musicians on stage and three projectors and seven cameras and a 14-minute medley of songs, some of which John Denver really didn't know.

    "So Frank comes out of the dressing room about five till six, and he says, 'How late are we gonna be?' I said, 'We are gonna start at six o'clock, Mr. Sinatra.' And he says, 'OK.' Now we get up there and Weintraub says to me, 'This is it, one take.' And I say, 'Absolutely.' I know how Frank hates to rehearse and how he hates to do more than one take.

    "He starts singing and it was great. But in the middle of the medley, your father hits a clam that you could drive a truck through. Really blows a note. He may have only hit six in his life, but this was number one or two of the six. The rest of the medley is great and we go downstairs, everybody tells him, 'That was great, that was great.' I was standing there and I didn't say anything. He said, 'What do you think?' I said, 'I loved almost all of it.' He said, 'Did you hear it?' I said, 'Yeah.' He says, 'Are you telling me you want me to do it again?' I said, 'I'm telling you, you want to do it again.' So he looks at me, and he could look longer at you in a few seconds than anyone in this world, 'cause those big blue eyes go right through you like two laser beams. And he looked at me for what seemed, oh, three and a half years, and everybody kinda backed up like there was going to be some kind of short-out, 'cause he's not crazy about retakes. He says, 'I'll give you four bars on either side.' I said, 'Deal.' He knew where it was, what it was, sang it again and that was the best note he ever hit in his whole life. He got to the end of the four bars and said, 'Good night, everybody,' and he was in the car and gone while everybody was still applauding."


    "...I've been a puppet, a pauper, a pirate, a poet, a pawn and a king.
    I've been up and down and over and out and I know one thing,
    Each time I find myself flat on my face,
    I pick myself up and get back in the race..."

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1965: Frank headlined with his old friend Joe E. Lewis in a two-week stand at the Eden Roc Hotel in Miami.

    JANUARY 23–FEBRUARY 12, 1963: Frank, Dean and Sammy did three weeks at the Sands.

    FEBRUARY 5–6, 1962: The production company was in New York filming climactic scenes for The Manchurian Candidate at Madison Square Garden.

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1961: Dad performed to packed houses for every show of a two week run at the Sands in Las Vegas.

    JANUARY 26–FEBRUARY 13, 1960: The members of the Summit filmed Ocean's Eleven on location in Vegas. It was the first of four films in which they starred together. FS played the ringleader of a gang of former Air Force buddies—including Dean, Sammy, Peter and Joey, along with Richard Conte and Henry Silva—who orchestrate a military-style holdup of five Las Vegas casinos. Of the Summit movies, my father said, "Of course they're not great movies. No one could claim that. We're not setting out to make Hamlet or Gone with the Wind. We gotta make pictures the people enjoy. Entertainment."

    FEBRUARY 6–15, 1953: During his appearance with the Bob Harrington Orchestra at the Chez Paree in Montreal, Dad forged a warm working relationship with pianist Bill Miller that continues today.

    FEBRUARY 2–8, 1940: When the Dorsey band opened at the Lyric Theatre in Indianapolis, the theater's ad in the Indianapolis Star listed Tommy's name in inch-high letters. At the bottom, in 1/8-inch type, was a listing for "Frank Sinatra, Romantic Virtuoso."

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]

  12. #3192

    February 7th

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    FEBRUARY 7, 1986: He celebrated President Reagan's 75th birthday at the White House.

    FEBRUARY 7, 8, 10, 11, 1985: He appeared at the Sunrise Musical Theater in Ft. Lauderdale.

    FEBRUARY 3–9, 1983: Again at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

    FEBRUARY 1–8, 1978: Frank returned to Caesars for another week.

    FEBRUARY 6–7, 1976: Producer George Schlatter: "We did a TV show with him and John Denver. I put together the longest medley I have ever done, which was a look back musically at the career of FS. Behind Frank and John there were three huge screens, all intertwined with projectors—his whole career would be projected on these screens. And in front of him there were guys from the Harry James band on one side, the Tommy Dorsey band on the other side, the Nelson Riddle orchestra in the center and Basie in front. A hundred musicians. And top to bottom, it was a 14-minute medley. I said, 'We're going to do this in one take, and I want it rehearsed. I want the band here at twelve o'clock, ready to rehearse. Frank's not on call till one, but I want to know everybody's there.'

    "They're all there and we got the sound balanced, and at 12:30 Frank walks in—half an hour early—and says, 'How long am I gonna have to wait?' And I said, 'Nelson?' And Nelson played the medley. And Frank said, 'That sounds pretty good.' I said, 'Would you like to sing that once?' He said, 'Yeah, of course I'd like to sing it once.' So he and John sang the medley. And Frank said, 'What are we gonna do now?' I said, 'Well, you don't need it, but John needs to rehearse again, 'cause these are new songs to him.' And so they ran through the medley again, and Frank says to me, 'Well, what time do we do this?' I said, 'The audience is coming at seven o'clock.' He said, 'Damn. What do you think, why don't we do it at six?' I said, 'Hey, that sounds good to me.' He said, 'No, really.' So we went around and got an audience together. And now we're ready to go. And you've got to understand, there's a hundred musicians on stage and three projectors and seven cameras and a 14-minute medley of songs, some of which John Denver really didn't know.

    "So Frank comes out of the dressing room about five till six, and he says, 'How late are we gonna be?' I said, 'We are gonna start at six o'clock, Mr. Sinatra.' And he says, 'OK.' Now we get up there and Weintraub says to me, 'This is it, one take.' And I say, 'Absolutely.' I know how Frank hates to rehearse and how he hates to do more than one take.

    "He starts singing and it was great. But in the middle of the medley, your father hits a clam that you could drive a truck through. Really blows a note. He may have only hit six in his life, but this was number one or two of the six. The rest of the medley is great and we go downstairs, everybody tells him, 'That was great, that was great.' I was standing there and I didn't say anything. He said, 'What do you think?' I said, 'I loved almost all of it.' He said, 'Did you hear it?' I said, 'Yeah.' He says, 'Are you telling me you want me to do it again?' I said, 'I'm telling you, you want to do it again.' So he looks at me, and he could look longer at you in a few seconds than anyone in this world, 'cause those big blue eyes go right through you like two laser beams. And he looked at me for what seemed, oh, three and a half years, and everybody kinda backed up like there was going to be some kind of short-out, 'cause he's not crazy about retakes. He says, 'I'll give you four bars on either side.' I said, 'Deal.' He knew where it was, what it was, sang it again and that was the best note he ever hit in his whole life. He got to the end of the four bars and said, 'Good night, everybody,' and he was in the car and gone while everybody was still applauding."

    FEBRUARY 7–11, 1973: The All-American Collegiate Golf Association, which raised money for scholarships, named him Man of the Year.

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1965: Frank headlined with his old friend Joe E. Lewis in a two-week stand at the Eden Roc Hotel in Miami.

    JANUARY 23–FEBRUARY 12, 1963: Frank, Dean and Sammy did three weeks at the Sands.

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1961: Dad performed to packed houses for every show of a two week run at the Sands in Las Vegas.

    FEBRUARY 7, 1960: According to her autobiography, Judith Campbell met John F. Kennedy at Dad's table in the lounge of the Sands Hotel in Vegas.

    JANUARY 26–FEBRUARY 13, 1960: The members of the Summit filmed Ocean's Eleven on location in Vegas. It was the first of four films in which they starred together. FS played the ringleader of a gang of former Air Force buddies—including Dean, Sammy, Peter and Joey, along with Richard Conte and Henry Silva—who orchestrate a military-style holdup of five Las Vegas casinos. Of the Summit movies, my father said, "Of course they're not great movies. No one could claim that. We're not setting out to make Hamlet or Gone with the Wind. We gotta make pictures the people enjoy. Entertainment."

    FEBRUARY 6–15, 1953: During his appearance with the Bob Harrington Orchestra at the Chez Paree in Montreal, Dad forged a warm working relationship with pianist Bill Miller that continues today.

    FEBRUARY 2–8, 1940: When the Dorsey band opened at the Lyric Theatre in Indianapolis, the theater's ad in the Indianapolis Star listed Tommy's name in inch-high letters. At the bottom, in 1/8-inch type, was a listing for "Frank Sinatra, Romantic Virtuoso."

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]

  13. FEBRUARY 6–15, 1953: During his appearance with the Bob Harrington Orchestra at the Chez Paree in Montreal, Dad forged a warm working relationship with pianist Bill Miller that continues today.
    A day all FS fans should celebrate.

  14. #3194

    February 8th

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    FEBRUARY 7, 8, 10, 11, 1985: He appeared at the Sunrise Musical Theater in Ft. Lauderdale.

    FEBRUARY 3–9, 1983: Again at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

    FEBRUARY 1–8, 1978: Frank returned to Caesars for another week.

    FEBRUARY 7–11, 1973: The All-American Collegiate Golf Association, which raised money for scholarships, named him Man of the Year.

    FEBRUARY 8–MARCH 4, 1972: Stepping up his schedule of charity work, Dad joined Arnold Palmer in co-sponsoring a Day with the All-Americans benefit golf tournament in Palm Springs on behalf of the Tony Lima Scholarship Fund. He also hosted a benefit for the Palm Springs Police Department, then played a mixed doubles tennis match on behalf of a Palm Springs hospital.


    Frank Sinatra and Bob Hope intersect
    once again.

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1965: Frank headlined with his old friend Joe E. Lewis in a two-week stand at the Eden Roc Hotel in Miami.

    JANUARY 23–FEBRUARY 12, 1963: Frank, Dean and Sammy did three weeks at the Sands.

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1961: Dad performed to packed houses for every show of a two week run at the Sands in Las Vegas.

    JANUARY 26–FEBRUARY 13, 1960: The members of the Summit filmed Ocean's Eleven on location in Vegas. It was the first of four films in which they starred together. FS played the ringleader of a gang of former Air Force buddies—including Dean, Sammy, Peter and Joey, along with Richard Conte and Henry Silva—who orchestrate a military-style holdup of five Las Vegas casinos. Of the Summit movies, my father said, "Of course they're not great movies. No one could claim that. We're not setting out to make Hamlet or Gone with the Wind. We gotta make pictures the people enjoy. Entertainment."

    FEBRUARY 8, 1958: When he got word on location that his friend and mentor Manie Sacks was dying of leukemia, FS flew to Philadelphia to be at Manie's bedside. Manie's death the next day, so soon after Bogart's, was a blow that staggered my father for a long time to come. Maine Sacks' nephew Herman Rush remembered Dad's visit to the hospital: "The doctor had issued standing orders—no visitors—but one afternoon the rule was broken by a young man on the thin side who stopped by the hospital to see Manie. 'Just say Frank Sinatra's calling.' Unexpected, unannounced, Sinatra had suddenly closed down production of Kings Go Forth, a movie he was starring in, covered the cost of a two-day shutdown personally, and had flown to Philadelphia to see Manie."


    When Uncle Manie Sacks died, my
    father cried. He said, "When I holler
    for help, he ain't gonna be there
    anymore. There's a little bit of Manie
    in everything good that has ever
    happened to me."

    FEBRUARY 6–15, 1953: During his appearance with the Bob Harrington Orchestra at the Chez Paree in Montreal, Dad forged a warm working relationship with pianist Bill Miller that continues today.

    FEBRUARY 8, 1952: Dad's latest film, Meet Danny Wilson—in which he starred as a brash but likable young crooner—premiered at the Orpheum Theater in San Francisco, and he attended the opening. There were some great songs in this one, including "I've Got a Crush on You," "She's Funny That Way," "You're a Sweetheart" and "All of Me." The Los Angeles Times observed that Danny Wilson's rise to fame and fortune as a bobby-soxer idol was "so much like Frankie's that the parallel is inescapable." The film didn't fare well at the box office.




    Frank, Ava, Dolly and Marty attend the premiere of Meet Danny Wilson.
    "It was the first role I could sink my teeth into," Dad recalled.

    FEBRUARY 8, 1947: He gave a "Command Performance" show for the armed forces in Miami.

    FEBRUARY 2–8, 1940: When the Dorsey band opened at the Lyric Theatre in Indianapolis, the theater's ad in the Indianapolis Star listed Tommy's name in inch-high letters. At the bottom, in 1/8-inch type, was a listing for "Frank Sinatra, Romantic Virtuoso."

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]

  15. FEBRUARY 8, 1958: When he got word on location that his friend and mentor Manie Sacks was dying of leukemia, FS flew to Philadelphia to be at Manie's bedside. Manie's death the next day, so soon after Bogart's, was a blow that staggered my father for a long time to come. Maine Sacks' nephew Herman Rush remembered Dad's visit to the hospital: "The doctor had issued standing orders—no visitors—but one afternoon the rule was broken by a young man on the thin side who stopped by the hospital to see Manie. 'Just say Frank Sinatra's calling.' Unexpected, unannounced, Sinatra had suddenly closed down production of Kings Go Forth, a movie he was starring in, covered the cost of a two-day shutdown personally, and had flown to Philadelphia to see Manie."
    When Uncle Manie Sacks died, my
    father cried. He said, "When I holler
    for help, he ain't gonna be there
    anymore. There's a little bit of Manie
    in everything good that has ever
    happened to me."
    Uncle Manie was one of the sweetest people who ever lived. I miss him today as I did decades ago. I still treasure two of the gifts he gave my parents.

  16. Unexpected, unannounced, Sinatra had suddenly closed down production of Kings Go Forth, a movie he was starring in, covered the cost of a two-day shutdown personally, and had flown to Philadelphia to see Manie.
    That is something typical for Frank! Really love these stories! It seems to me FS was always around when you needed him!
    How little we know, how much to discover

  17. #3197

    February 9th

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    FEBRUARY 3–9, 1983: Again at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

    FEBRUARY 9, 1975: With Frank hosting the ceremony, Orson Welles received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Film Institute in Los Angeles.

    FEBRUARY 7–11, 1973: The All-American Collegiate Golf Association, which raised money for scholarships, named him Man of the Year.

    FEBRUARY 8–MARCH 4, 1972: Stepping up his schedule of charity work, Dad joined Arnold Palmer in co-sponsoring a Day with the All-Americans benefit golf tournament in Palm Springs on behalf of the Tony Lima Scholarship Fund. He also hosted a benefit for the Palm Springs Police Department, then played a mixed doubles tennis match on behalf of a Palm Springs hospital.

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1965: Frank headlined with his old friend Joe E. Lewis in a two-week stand at the Eden Roc Hotel in Miami.

    JANUARY 23–FEBRUARY 12, 1963: Frank, Dean and Sammy did three weeks at the Sands.

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1961: Dad performed to packed houses for every show of a two week run at the Sands in Las Vegas.

    JANUARY 26–FEBRUARY 13, 1960: The members of the Summit filmed Ocean's Eleven on location in Vegas. It was the first of four films in which they starred together. FS played the ringleader of a gang of former Air Force buddies—including Dean, Sammy, Peter and Joey, along with Richard Conte and Henry Silva—who orchestrate a military-style holdup of five Las Vegas casinos. Of the Summit movies, my father said, "Of course they're not great movies. No one could claim that. We're not setting out to make Hamlet or Gone with the Wind. We gotta make pictures the people enjoy. Entertainment."

    FEBRUARY 6–15, 1953: During his appearance with the Bob Harrington Orchestra at the Chez Paree in Montreal, Dad forged a warm working relationship with pianist Bill Miller that continues today.

    FEBRUARY 9, 1940: Still on the road, the [Dorsey] band played a college date at the University of Michigan.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]

  18. #3198

    February 10th

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    FEBRUARY 7, 8, 10, 11, 1985: He appeared at the Sunrise Musical Theater in Ft. Lauderdale.

    FEBRUARY 7–11, 1973: The All-American Collegiate Golf Association, which raised money for scholarships, named him Man of the Year.

    FEBRUARY 8–MARCH 4, 1972: Stepping up his schedule of charity work, Dad joined Arnold Palmer in co-sponsoring a Day with the All-Americans benefit golf tournament in Palm Springs on behalf of the Tony Lima Scholarship Fund. He also hosted a benefit for the Palm Springs Police Department, then played a mixed doubles tennis match on behalf of a Palm Springs hospital.

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1965: Frank headlined with his old friend Joe E. Lewis in a two-week stand at the Eden Roc Hotel in Miami.

    JANUARY 23–FEBRUARY 12, 1963: Frank, Dean and Sammy did three weeks at the Sands.

    FEBRUARY 10, 1962: He appeared at a special benefit screening of Sergeants 3 for handicapped children at the Capitol Theater in New York.

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1961: Dad performed to packed houses for every show of a two week run at the Sands in Las Vegas.

    JANUARY 26–FEBRUARY 13, 1960: The members of the Summit filmed Ocean's Eleven on location in Vegas. It was the first of four films in which they starred together. FS played the ringleader of a gang of former Air Force buddies—including Dean, Sammy, Peter and Joey, along with Richard Conte and Henry Silva—who orchestrate a military-style holdup of five Las Vegas casinos. Of the Summit movies, my father said, "Of course they're not great movies. No one could claim that. We're not setting out to make Hamlet or Gone with the Wind. We gotta make pictures the people enjoy. Entertainment."

    FEBRUARY 6–15, 1953: During his appearance with the Bob Harrington Orchestra at the Chez Paree in Montreal, Dad forged a warm working relationship with pianist Bill Miller that continues today.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]

  19. #3199

    February 11th

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    FEBRUARY 7, 8, 10, 11, 1985: He appeared at the Sunrise Musical Theater in Ft. Lauderdale.

    FEBRUARY 11–17, 1982: Comedian Pat Henry, a longtime friend of Dad's who frequently opened for him, died in his sleep during an engagement at Caesars Palace.

    FEBRUARY 7–11, 1973: The All-American Collegiate Golf Association, which raised money for scholarships, named him Man of the Year.

    FEBRUARY 8–MARCH 4, 1972: Stepping up his schedule of charity work, Dad joined Arnold Palmer in co-sponsoring a Day with the All-Americans benefit golf tournament in Palm Springs on behalf of the Tony Lima Scholarship Fund. He also hosted a benefit for the Palm Springs Police Department, then played a mixed doubles tennis match on behalf of a Palm Springs hospital.

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1965: Frank headlined with his old friend Joe E. Lewis in a two-week stand at the Eden Roc Hotel in Miami.

    JANUARY 23–FEBRUARY 12, 1963: Frank, Dean and Sammy did three weeks at the Sands.

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1961: Dad performed to packed houses for every show of a two week run at the Sands in Las Vegas.

    JANUARY 26–FEBRUARY 13, 1960: The members of the Summit filmed Ocean's Eleven on location in Vegas. It was the first of four films in which they starred together. FS played the ringleader of a gang of former Air Force buddies—including Dean, Sammy, Peter and Joey, along with Richard Conte and Henry Silva—who orchestrate a military-style holdup of five Las Vegas casinos. Of the Summit movies, my father said, "Of course they're not great movies. No one could claim that. We're not setting out to make Hamlet or Gone with the Wind. We gotta make pictures the people enjoy. Entertainment."

    FEBRUARY 6–15, 1953: During his appearance with the Bob Harrington Orchestra at the Chez Paree in Montreal, Dad forged a warm working relationship with pianist Bill Miller that continues today.

    FEBRUARY 11, 1947: En route to Mexico City for a vacation with Mom, Dad stopped off for two days to gamble in Havana. Deplaning from a Pan-American clipper, he was allegedly photographed with Rocco and Joe Fischetti, former childhood acquaintances from Hoboken. After a day spent at a casino and the racetrack, friends of the Fischettis invited him to join a group in the dining room of the Hotel Nacional. Later that evening, another photographer allegedly took Dad's picture with several other friends of the Fischettis. One of them was Charles "Lucky" Luciano, deported boss of the Cosa Nostra crime syndicate. In a series of articles, Lee Mortimer of the Hearst syndicate accused my father of being a sidekick of mobsters, which only exacerbated the continuing FBI investigation. Publicist George Evans had to fly to Havana to discuss these charges with Dad, telling him that his career was in jeopardy and he had better return home. My father followed Evans' advice. Unfortunately, this story—which would later be blown completely out of proportion—wouldn't go away.

    FEBRUARY 11, 1941: Still in New York—continuing on the Fame and Fortune show every Thursday night on NBC radio—the [Dorsey] band made a second sold-out appearance at the Meadowbrook.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]

  20. #3200

    February 12th

    (From the Guestbook page and the online book Frank Sinatra: An American Legend by Nancy Sinatra )

    FEBRUARY 12, 1983: At the "Love In II" benefit at the Canyon Country Club and Hotel for the Desert Hospital, FS performed with Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr., George Kirby and me.



    Frank, Dean and Sammy. Three guys who just happened to meet, just happened to become brothers? Dean says it was Frank's plan. I believe it was God's plan. Dean: "Frank and I are brothers, right? Blood brothers. We cut the top of our thumbs and we became brothers. He wanted to cut the wrist. I said, 'What, are you, crazy? No, here's good enough.' To me, he's always been my brother. We're alike."

    FEBRUARY 11–17, 1982: Comedian Pat Henry, a longtime friend of Dad's who frequently opened for him, died in his sleep during an engagement at Caesars Palace.

    FEBRUARY 12–18, 1981: Back onstage for another week at Caesars Palace.

    FEBRUARY 8–MARCH 4, 1972: Stepping up his schedule of charity work, Dad joined Arnold Palmer in co-sponsoring a Day with the All-Americans benefit golf tournament in Palm Springs on behalf of the Tony Lima Scholarship Fund. He also hosted a benefit for the Palm Springs Police Department, then played a mixed doubles tennis match on behalf of a Palm Springs hospital.

    FEBRUARY 12, 1967: With only a piano as accompaniment, Dad appeared along with Ethel Merman, Gene Kelly, Garson Kanin and others at a benefit for the University of Southern California library: a glorious two-hour tribute to the genius of the late Cole Porter. He sang a lovely ballad version of "I've Got You Under My Skin."

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1965: Frank headlined with his old friend Joe E. Lewis in a two-week stand at the Eden Roc Hotel in Miami.

    JANUARY 23–FEBRUARY 12, 1963: Frank, Dean and Sammy did three weeks at the Sands.

    FEBRUARY 1–14, 1961: Dad performed to packed houses for every show of a two week run at the Sands in Las Vegas.

    JANUARY 26–FEBRUARY 13, 1960: The members of the Summit filmed Ocean's Eleven on location in Vegas. It was the first of four films in which they starred together. FS played the ringleader of a gang of former Air Force buddies—including Dean, Sammy, Peter and Joey, along with Richard Conte and Henry Silva—who orchestrate a military-style holdup of five Las Vegas casinos. Of the Summit movies, my father said, "Of course they're not great movies. No one could claim that. We're not setting out to make Hamlet or Gone with the Wind. We gotta make pictures the people enjoy. Entertainment."

    FEBRUARY 6–15, 1953: During his appearance with the Bob Harrington Orchestra at the Chez Paree in Montreal, Dad forged a warm working relationship with pianist Bill Miller that continues today.

    [Dates of new entries highlighted in blue]

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