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Thread: What the Climate Crisis Looks Like

  1. What the Climate Crisis Looks Like

    What the Climate Crisis Looks Like

    Source: YouTube


  2. #2
    Wow- this really packs a wallop! I still don't understand how some refuse to believe we have a climate crisis.
    You can't have everything... where would you put it?
    Sally

  3. #3
    This has been my mantra for years....

    Record highs
    Record lows
    Record rains
    Record snows

    ... and Mother Nature is breathing harder and harder trying to keep it all contained.

    The marble is almost out of the bowl.
    Pack a small bag....

  4. #4
    Amen Ace!
    You can't have everything... where would you put it?
    Sally

  5. #5
    Incredibly scary stuff, and the changes are easily verifiable against a couple of centuries of recording the weather. This is no joke, and it is not going to go away.

    Our courageous government has put a carbon tax on major polluters throught the Parliament. The tax is very, very unpopular and the government is almost certain to be turned out at the next elections, but they have done the right thing with this. I am hoping it is not too late.

  6. Ace, you're describing a spinning top, a gyroscope, knocked off-center, and wobbling recklessly.

    Proponents of climate crisis shouldn't call it global warming, as its extremes also include exacerbated cooling.

    And, yes, I had my share - had to sacrifice a six-trunk sixty foot tall clump silver maple. I feel like a monster for that.
    ......pick yourself up...... ......dust yourself off...... ......start all over again...... (my e-mail)

  7. That's a frightening video.

  8. #8
    Unfortunately, the video is only showing the tip of the iceberg. Floods are now occuring in places that did not flood in the past. We experienced an earthquake on the east coast which normally doesn't happen. We've had the wettest year in recent memory. Flood events are getting closer and closer together. Add to all that the growing population, which forces all to produce more with less. We're certainly not only shooting ourselves in the foot; we're rapidly reloading and taking multiple shots just to make sure.
    Out of the tree of life, I just picked me a plum

  9. #9
    What Nancy presented is supported by NOAA
    The warm season (April-September) 2011 Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI) is 100.0, which is the highest warm season value in 117 years. (The period of record mean is 52.0). The REDTI model indicates that the national residential energy consumption was 10.3 percent above the mean for the period of record. The correlation between energy usage and the REDIT is 0.51.
    Check it out: NOAA - State of the Climate

    Also:

    Scientific Assessments - Key Findings

    Number one on the list:
    Global warming is unequivocal and primarily human-induced.
    If humans caused it, humans can fix it.

    We just need to act and do the right thing for future generations.


    "The candle flame gutters. Its little pool of light trembles. Darkness gathers. The demons begin to stir." -- Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Ace917 View Post
    The marble is almost out of the bowl.
    Absolutely.

    An independent analysis has been performed by Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature and their results have been released this month.

    Not surprisingly, the new study agrees with NASA and the lead scientist was forced to admit:

    Climate skeptic admits he was wrong to doubt global-warming data
    "Our results turned out to be close to those published by prior groups. We think that means that those groups had truly been careful in their work, despite their inability to convince some skeptics."
    Good for him. This should put the deniers out of business once and for all (hopefully).


    "The candle flame gutters. Its little pool of light trembles. Darkness gathers. The demons begin to stir." -- Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark

  11. #11
    while i agree, more must be done environmentally speaking. to go back one or two hundred years is so minuscule in the grand scheme of things. i believe there is theory's that the earth's climate cycles, some of this theory is backed up with ice core samples.

    we are the keepers of this planet, it speaks volumes when you see the abuses put upon it for no other reason than profit.

    personally, i believe greed to be the most common component in many of today's issues.

  12. #12
    Scary stuff, and, they didn't even mention the huge tornadoes that caused major damage to Tuscaloosa, Birmingham, Nashville and many, many other urban areas.
    Always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim.
    Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented. ~ Ellie Wiesel

  13. #13
    Again, a new report from the IPCC is backing up Nancy's first post:

    Panel says wild weather worsens
    "The extremes are a really noticeable aspect of climate change," said Jerry Meehl, senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. "I think people realize that the extremes are where we are going to see a lot of the impacts of climate change."
    ...
    Warmer air can hold more water and puts more energy into weather systems, changing the dynamics of storms and where and how they hit.

    "The candle flame gutters. Its little pool of light trembles. Darkness gathers. The demons begin to stir." -- Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark

  14. #14

    © OurAmazingPlanet.com

    Just picked up today:

    A huge, emerging crack has been discovered in one of Antarctica's glaciers, with a NASA plane mission providing the first-ever detailed airborne measurements of a major iceberg breakup in progress.
    NASA's Operation Ice Bridge, the largest airborne survey of Earth's polar ice ever flown, is in the midst of its third field campaign from Punta Arenas, Chile. The six-year mission will yield an unprecedented three-dimensional view of Arctic and Antarctic ice sheets, ice shelves and sea ice. The glaciers of the Antarctic, and Greenland, Ice Sheets, commonly birth icebergs that break off from the main ice streams where they flow in to the sea, a process called calving.

    The crack was found in c, which last calved a significant iceberg in 2001; some scientists have speculated recently that it was primed to calve again. But until an Oct. 14 IceBridge flight, no one had seen any evidence of the ice shelf beginning to break apart. Since then, a more detailed look back at satellite imagery seems to show the first signs of the crack in early October.

    "We are actually now witnessing how it happens and it's very exciting for us," said IceBridge project scientist Michael Studinger of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "It's part of a natural process, but itís pretty exciting to be here and actually observe it while it happens."


    Gravity pulls the ice in the glacier westward along Antarctica's Hudson Mountains toward the Amundsen Sea. A floating tongue of ice reaches out 30 miles (48 kilometers) into the Amundsen beyond the grounding line, the below-sea-level point where the ice shelf locks onto the continental bedrock. As ice pushes toward the sea from the interior, inevitably the ice shelf will crack and send a large iceberg free. [Photo Album: Antarctica, Iceberg Maker]

    Pine Island Glacier is of particular interest to scientists because it is big and unstable and so is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in global sea level rise projections.

    A primary goal of Operation IceBridge is to put the same instruments over the exact same flight lines and satellite tracks, year after year, to gather meaningful and accurate data of how ice sheets and glaciers are changing over time. But discovering a developing rift in one of the most significant science targets in the world of glaciology offered a brief change in agenda for the Oct. 26 flight, if only for a 30-minute diversion from the day's prescribed flight lines.

    The IceBridge team observed the rift running across the ice shelf for about 18 miles (29 km), using an instrument called the Airborne Topographic Mapper, which uses a technology called lidar (light detection and ranging) that sends out a laser beam that bounces off a surface and back to the device. The lidar instrument measured the rift's shoulders about 820 feet (250 meters) apart at its widest, although the rift stretched about 260 feet (79 meters) wide along most of the crack. The deepest points from the ice shelf surface ranged from 165 to 195 feet (50 to 60 meters).

    When the iceberg breaks free, it will cover about 340 square miles (880 square kilometers) of surface area. Radar measurements suggested the ice shelf in the region of the rift is about 1,640 feet (500 meters) feet thick, with only about 160 feet of the shelf floating above water and the rest submerged.

    It is likely that once the iceberg floats away, the leading edge of the ice shelf will have receded farther than at any time since its location was first recorded in the 1940s.
    Out of the tree of life, I just picked me a plum

  15. #15
    With China and India coming online this is not very surprising:

    Biggest jump ever seen in global warming gases
    The world pumped about 564 million more tons (512 million metric tons) of carbon into the air in 2010 than it did in 2009. That's an increase of 6 percent. That amount of extra pollution eclipses the individual emissions of all but three countries ó China, the United States and India, the world's top producers of greenhouse gases.

    It is a "monster" increase that is unheard of, said Gregg Marland, a professor of geology at Appalachian State University, who has helped calculate Department of Energy figures in the past.
    So, there is no doubt that the climate crisis will continue to worsen.

    "The candle flame gutters. Its little pool of light trembles. Darkness gathers. The demons begin to stir." -- Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark

  16. #16
    Only if CO2 is the cause which science clearly shows it is not. Ice extent during October 2011 increased at an average rate of 114,900 square kilometers (44,360 square miles) per day, about 40% faster than the average growth rate for October 1979 to 2000. This was not accounted for by the models. Also the BEST study clearly shows no warming since 1998. The co-author has been lambasting Muller for days on his release of non-peer reviewed findings.
    Never mind that all the previous model based forecasts are failing. Temperatures instead of accelerating have flatlined, sea level is falling not rising, snow is increasing not diminishing, the winters are becoming colder not warmer, the global hurricane ACE index is near a 30 year low and on and on....
    Rick
    The enemy of truth is distortion.

  17. #17
    The crisis, that Nancy pointed to in her first post, along with the data provided by the peer reviewed science have won over Muller who was once a very vocal critic.

    As AGW continues unabated, the impacts will win over the remaining critics (yes, eventually even Rick.)

    All one needs to do is take Muller's data and average the temperatures over each decade going back 50 years (the time span we have been pumping large amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere) - the trend will be obvious and undeniable.

    Watching the video Nancy provided gives a glimpse of what the future holds for our warming planet. More and more years will be like this - not every year - but the probability of having warmer years increases and with it more weather extremes.

    "The candle flame gutters. Its little pool of light trembles. Darkness gathers. The demons begin to stir." -- Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark

  18. #18
    Mike,
    Remember, "More doctors smoke Camels." Despite what the nay-sayers preach, we need to start working on solutions.....something we used to be good at but seem to have lost that ability. There needs to be a two-pronged approach to this problem........Reduced carbon emissions, which means renewable, alternative energy sources that includes hydro, tind, solar and nuclear in the mix. Add to that an increase in the green plant (trees) population so that photosynthesis can convert more CO2 to O2. Unless that happens, we're just headed farther down the road to our fate.
    Out of the tree of life, I just picked me a plum

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeHOU View Post

    As AGW continues unabated, the impacts will win over the remaining critics (yes, eventually even Rick.)


    Watching the video Nancy provided gives a glimpse of what the future holds for our warming planet. More and more years will be like this - not every year - but the probability of having warmer years increases and with it more weather extremes.
    I couldn't disagree more, as shocking as that may be. The video Nancy posted was not unlike anything we haven't seen in the past. But we've got more media today, more evangelist environmentalists and more people. Storm severity is observed and with precedence. Texas wildfires are normal. The Texas Forestry Service even said most of the fires were arson related. Droughts in that area are common. Just because we observe something in our lifetime for the first time doesn't mean it hasn't happened before.

    Temperatures have flat lined despite an increase in CO2. The theory of CO2 based heating is debunked/dead!

    Spend money on R&D...not bad science and politics. Stop wasting money on ethanol subsidies which reduce our food supply. Let's be smart before we totally kill our economy like California just did.
    Rick
    The enemy of truth is distortion.

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Szulczewski View Post
    Despite what the nay-sayers preach, we need to start working on solutions.....something we used to be good at but seem to have lost that ability.
    I agree, Joe.

    It can and will happen again once we get out of this politically driven mini dark age.

    "The candle flame gutters. Its little pool of light trembles. Darkness gathers. The demons begin to stir." -- Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark

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