View Poll Results: What is your favorite version of All or Nothing at All?

Voters
18. You may not vote on this poll
  • 1939 ver.

    6 33.33%
  • 1962 ver. on Sinatra and Strings

    3 16.67%
  • 1966 ver. on Strangers in the Night

    9 50.00%
  • 1977 dico ver.

    0 0%
Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Favorite Version of All or Nothing at All?

  1. #1

    Favorite Version of All or Nothing at All?

    What is your favorite studio version of All or Nothing at All by Sinatra?

    There are four versions - 1939 ver. with Harry James, 1962 ver. on Sinatra & Strings, 1966 ver. on Strangers in the Night and 1977 disco version.

    Now, which do you prefer the best? Look forward to see how you think.

  2. #2
    1962
    When You're Here, It's Family
    www.reverbnation.com/Soundslikefrank/songs

  3. This might be helpful:

    1939 ó> All Or Nothing At All, a song by Harry James, Frank Sinatra on Spotify

    Source: YouTube


    1962 ó> All Or Nothing At All, a song by Frank Sinatra on Spotify

    Source: YouTube


    1966 ó> All Or Nothing At All, a song by Frank Sinatra on Spotify

    Source: YouTube


    1977 ó> All Or Nothing At All, Disco Version (unavailable on Spotify)


    But how can you vote for just one?

    Bob.

  4. #4
    Let's take a look at each version.

    The 1939 version is truly iconic. The overall arrangement stands out to me - the intro hooks you and makes you want to listen to the song again and again. Sinatra's vocal is not as strong as that in his later years, but is youthful and really good. Both historically and musically essential recording.

    The 1962 version isn't really improvement over the last one. The intro, on the contrary to the 1939 version, is a bit too dramatic, and Sinatra's vocal is barely okay. This Sinatra & Strings album (which I recently gave a listen for the first time and haven't really gotten into it) has its moments, but not this.

    The 1966 hard swing version is my favorite of the four. Nelson Riddle's arrangement here is a killer! The song builds up in the same manner as I've Got You Under My Skin in 1956, and where the band gets to the climax is quite simply majestic. Sinatra is also on fire, giving it arguably his best in his later career.

    The 1977 version is not bad (actually I was going to call it a "stinker", but had to change my view after giving it another listen) It kinda reminds me of recently released The Beach Boys (which I'm a big fan of) with Royal Philharmonic Orchestra album, where the orchestra is overdubbed on the classic original track - Sinatra's vocal doesn't fit the backing track at all, and sounds like digitally cut from wholly another recording. The backing track is interesting though, which makes me wonder if it would have been better to ask disco musicians to make a Sinatra cover album.

    I voted for the 1966 version.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Watamushi View Post
    The 1939 version is truly iconic. The overall arrangement stands out to me - the intro hooks you and makes you want to listen to the song again and again. Sinatra's vocal is not as strong as that in his later years, but is youthful and really good. Both historically and musically essential recording.
    I prefer the 1939 version Watamushi for the reasons you sited above. Although Mr. Sinatra was only 23 years old at the time he recorded this version, and in no way was he the singer he was destined to become, this is the version I find myself going to most often. In fact a cd with this song rests atop my cd player. Why bother to put it away when I refer to it as often as I do?

    Larry

  6. #6
    Watamushi - With due respect, do you really think his vocal on the Sinatra and Strings version is just "barely okay?" I think it's tremendous myself, though if forced to pick just one version of this song, I would also go with the swinging Riddle arrangement from 1966.

  7. #7
    I remember on the Ultimate Event video, Sammy Davis joking something along the lines of hating the song, when Frank sings it as part of the long medley. I don't hate it, but it's not a favourite, by any means. That said, I find the 1966 one the most enjoyable - to me, at least. I recognise the iconic nature of the 1939 recording, but important recordings (even great ones) are not necessarily ones that are our own personal favourite. There's also the issue, I think, that sometimes we like the version we heard first - which, in my case, was the 1966 one. But if I were to turn to any version it would be the live version from Japan in 1985.

  8. #8
    66' Strangers in the Night
    I actually love the swinging organ used on the album and this song

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffK View Post
    Watamushi - With due respect, do you really think his vocal on the Sinatra and Strings version is just "barely okay?" I think it's tremendous myself, though if forced to pick just one version of this song, I would also go with the swinging Riddle arrangement from 1966.
    Ah, "barely okay" was maybe too harsh, sorry. I meant that it wasn't on the same level as 1939 or 1966 version. It's nice, but just not as good.
    Last edited by Watamushi; 06-30-2018 at 10:01 AM.

  10. We donít often get polls here, but there must be more than eight people willing to cast a vote!

    Hint: Click on one of the counts at the right side of the poll results at the top of the thread, to see who voted for what.

    Bob.

  11. #11
    Hi Watamushi - No need to apologize; I was just wondering if you really thought that. -)

  12. #12
    I hope nobody minds if I say that when it comes to polls like this we should all keep in my mind that each member may appreciate a particular version. Iím sure many members have very personal attachments to certain recordings due to their own life experiences. Letís remember to always post with kindness and not judge others on their favorite particular recordings.

  13. #13
    I adored everything that Nelson arranged and conducted on the "Strangers in the Night" album, and especially loved his "All or Nothing at All" chart. The Costa chart with those strings is fabulous! And the original 1939 recording is, as the expression goes, "One For The Ages!" In fact, it's part of every Sinatra
    fan's DNA!
    Stanley

  14. #14
    The 1966 hard swing version is my favorite of the four. Nelson Riddle's arrangement here is a killer! The song builds up in the same manner as I've Got You Under My Skin in 1956, and where the band gets to the climax is quite simply majestic. Sinatra is also on fire, giving it arguably his best in his later career. (Watamushi)

    Right on.
    Gary
    Cha Bobba

Bookmarks

Bookmarks