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Thread: IT HAPPENED IN BROOKLYN - 1947 

  1. #81
    A man of many talents!

    Source: YouTube

    Pack a small bag....

  2. #82
    Neat Ace,

    Did you see how effortlessly and gracefully Mr. Sinatra scaled the fence/gate using only one hand toward the end of his aria? I was never young enough to attempt that. Such magic (his singing, not his athleticism). Corny as it is I just love this movie.

    Larry

  3. #83
    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzotedesco View Post
    Did you see how effortlessly and gracefully Mr. Sinatra scaled the fence/gate using only one hand toward the end of his aria?
    I did, as a matter of fact! Very smooth!
    Pack a small bag....

  4. Just noticed this is starting right now on TCM.

    Bob.

  5. #85
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob in Boston View Post
    Just noticed this is starting right now on TCM.
    Thanks Bob. I taped it and watched it last night. Why I bother since I own the dvd I'll leave for others to ponder.

    I love corn. From the kind you eat, to the jokes that make my kids groan. I simply love corn. And at times I crave some MGM style corn of which this picture fills the bill. IHIB has everything I want in a musical and less. It has a romantic, mythic version of a Brooklyn that couldn't possibly have ever existed, though I would leave that to June to explain. Why do so many movies romanticize this one borough so? It has the great Durante (...and Jimmy Durante's looks give me a thrill) who I believe actually hailed from Brooklyn and mesmerizes me in every scene he appears in. But mostly it has Sinatra; Sinatra in his black and white Columbia prime at that (I wonder why this one wasn't filmed in that sparkling MGM color). IHIB is his film. He doesn't have to share it with anyone. He sings atop that iconic bridge. He sings with the great Durante, paying tribute to Jolson along the way. He sings in Russian. He even sings an aria from Don Giovanni with Ms. Grayson. And he does it all, every number, and every scene for that matter, with a simplicity, a grace and a naturalness that charms me every time. Sure, maybe this is the movie version of Frankie. But I love it. The songs are among my favorites from the Columbia era. Would that MGM had serialized this version of Sinatra and made a bunch of them like they did the Andy Hardy films from a decade earlier. They could have done one for each borough. And as I said earlier it also has less. IHIB doesn't have any overly long dance suites or intellectual pretension in spite of several classical pieces found in it. It just comes from the heart. Bravo Mr. Sinatra.

    Larry

  6. Nice piece of writing, Larry.

  7. #87
    Frank absolutely ADORED The Great Durante (as did all of us)! There was some discussion about a possible film starring Der Bingle, Dean, & Frank as Clayton, Jackson & Durante! C, J, & D were to 1920s nightclub audiences what Martin & Lewis were to the late '40's and '50s! It would have been a fabulous film!
    Stanley

  8. #88
    Bump!

    Because I taped and watched this film again. It had the same affect on me as it did two years ago. Nothing has changed. You can't profess to be a Frank Sinatra fan if you're not familiar with It Happened in Brooklyn. Maybe not MGM's "A" treatment i.e. not in color.....but still a wonderful example of what FS was like during his Columbia/MGM period.

    Larry

    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzotedesco View Post
    Thanks Bob. I taped it and watched it last night. Why I bother since I own the dvd I'll leave for others to ponder.

    I love corn. From the kind you eat, to the jokes that make my kids groan. I simply love corn. And at times I crave some MGM style corn of which this picture fills the bill. IHIB has everything I want in a musical and less. It has a romantic, mythic version of a Brooklyn that couldn't possibly have ever existed, though I would leave that to June to explain. Why do so many movies romanticize this one borough so? It has the great Durante (...and Jimmy Durante's looks give me a thrill) who I believe actually hailed from Brooklyn and mesmerizes me in every scene he appears in. But mostly it has Sinatra; Sinatra in his black and white Columbia prime at that (I wonder why this one wasn't filmed in that sparkling MGM color). IHIB is his film. He doesn't have to share it with anyone. He sings atop that iconic bridge. He sings with the great Durante, paying tribute to Jolson along the way. He sings in Russian. He even sings an aria from Don Giovanni with Ms. Grayson. And he does it all, every number, and every scene for that matter, with a simplicity, a grace and a naturalness that charms me every time. Sure, maybe this is the movie version of Frankie. But I love it. The songs are among my favorites from the Columbia era. Would that MGM had serialized this version of Sinatra and made a bunch of them like they did the Andy Hardy films from a decade earlier. They could have done one for each borough. And as I said earlier it also has less. IHIB doesn't have any overly long dance suites or intellectual pretension in spite of several classical pieces found in it. It just comes from the heart. Bravo Mr. Sinatra.

    Larry

  9. #89
    Bravo, Larry! Wonderful post! Only one thing to "clarify" -- The Great James Francis Durante hails from the Lower East Side (as does Yours Truly)! "It Happened in Brooklyn" is a terrifically entertaining musical, and Frank's musical moments are, in a word, thrilling!
    Stanley

  10. #90
    Since I will be in Brooklyn tomorrow -- my cousins and I are going to "divvy up" the many photo albums, records, and books that my Aunt Bobbi & Uncle Eli compiled in their 60+ years of marriage -- Eunice & I are watching "It Happened In Brooklyn." I hope there are photos of Bobbi with her dearest friend, Sylvia Syms, although I think Bobbi's sister in Florida got ahold of those years ago. Tomorrow will be very bittersweet!
    Stanley

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